What's the link? Supplements causing sleep issues....

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Hi,

I wondering if anyone could help me with my puzzle.
I find that the following supplements make me feel really great during the day (taken first thing in the morning individually e.g. not all on the same day), but then really disrupt my sleep that night:
  • Vitamin B2 100mg (I get some in my multi anyway, but it’s a fraction of this amount)
  • ALCAR (Acetyl L Carnitine)
  • DIM (Diindolylmethane)
  • High dose Zinc (e.g. 50mg)

This is quite frustrating as I know that they are doing me good (e.g. I look more healthy, have better memory, less histamine issues), but I end up getting too tired to function through the lack of sleep if I continue with any of them for more than a couple of days.

Any help/ideas on the link between these (and maybe how to work around it) would be greatly appreciated!

For info:
  • I am 99% certain that I have COMT issues based on reactions to certain supplements that are known to decrease COMT activity (e.g. quercetin, pycnogenol), but from what I can see, the above should not negatively impact COMT at all and I have read that DIM can increase COMT. (I have sent off a 23andMe test, but results have not yet arrived)
  • I have been doing methylation support for a few years (first Simplified, then Freddd’s, now somewhere in the middle).
  • If I take glutathione in the afternoon, the negative sleep affects are magnified if either of the above were consumed earlier in the day, but taking glutathione in isolation does not affect my sleep (it used to, but not for several months).
  • I take 23mg of Zinc a day – I find that I have to have some Zinc, but if I have any more than this, then it causes the same sleep issues.
 

Wishful

Senior Member
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No suggestions, but I get sleep issues even without taking any of those supplements. :grumpy:

I've had to give up quite a few foods (yummy stuff of course) and physical activity later than mid-afternoon. :grumpy::grumpy: Maybe somewhere out there there's a supplement cocktail or herbal treatment that would block those insomnia triggers, but I just lack the energy to pursue such a treatment.
 
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No suggestions, but I get sleep issues even without taking any of those supplements. :grumpy:

I've had to give up quite a few foods (yummy stuff of course) and physical activity later than mid-afternoon. :grumpy::grumpy: Maybe somewhere out there there's a supplement cocktail or herbal treatment that would block those insomnia triggers, but I just lack the energy to pursue such a treatment.
From that limited info, I would suggest looking into histamine Intolerance and ways to combat it. Have you considered this before?

Sensitivity to histamine can disrupt sleep, cause fatigue (mental and physical) and be a real nightmare for food options.

Read more here:
https://mybiohack.com/blog/treat-de...st-cells-histamine-intolerance-diet-naturally

Basically, avoid high histamine foods, improve methylation, support dao, bh4 and nrf2, plus use Daosin to enable a wider diet.

Good luck.
 

Wishful

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I'm pretty sure that histamines are not responsible for my insomnia. High-histamine foods don't bother me. Responding to an allergy (histamine release) doesn't affect my sleep. I think it's related to insulin, since I get insomnia from both easily-digested carbs and from exercise. Hmm, I think I'll look into the proper testing of insulin responses. I probably haven't had that checked since this problem developed.
 

Wishful

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I did a simple test of the hypothesis that insulin level was affecting my sleep. I had some sweets before going to bed. While I assume that it affected my insulin level, it didn't change my sleep pattern. The same amount of sugar at 3 PM did give me insomnia. So, if insulin is involved in my sleep problems, it's a delayed reaction, and probably involves one or more intermediary reactions. Not simple. :grumpy: