What lessons can be learned from Dr. Paul Marik regarding COVID-19?

nerd

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The COVID-19 pandemic has really shown me how the medical system works and how politics can influence the progress of a pandemic. I think there are many lessons to learn for CFS/ME. The following are some points from two webinars with Dr. Paul Marik, the leading scientists who pushed dexamethasone into current guidelines with the FLCCC and who now urges for the use of Ivermectin, Vitamin D, and Melatonin as preventative measures of developing COVID-19 and for alleviating it.

PCR loads and antibody tests aren't reliable markers for viral infections and syndromes. They aren't sensitive enough and they have to be done early. Late negative tests don't exclude viral-induced conditions. This applies to EBV and other pathogens as well.

Virus inhibitor treatment only works when viral replication is still ongoing. Antirivrals won't have any effect during the protein-mediated phase of a viral-induced condition. Only treatments that target these proteins and their consequences can show improvement. If CFS/ME is virally-induced, there is no reason for virus inhibition when there is no viral load. But medications such as Ivermectin are not only virus inhibitors but can also modulate immune activation and suppress subacute viral pathophysiological signaling.

Many clinicians are ill-informed and use medication not as indicated, possibly enhancing disease pathology.

Timing is important! Acute and subacute viral-induced conditions should be differentiated. Biomarkers, immunological markers, symptomatic markers, and treatment options differ depending on the condition's phase. PEM and non-PEM are such phases. Hence, this should be considered in the outcome evaluation of CFS/ME studies and trials.

The post-COVID-19 "long-hauler" syndrome is real. This was clear to Dr. Marik more than half a year ago. It might be caused by ongoing low-level immunological inflammation, as is evident in the late phase's immune dysregulation of COVID-19.

A possible reason why mild COVID-19 cases are more prevalent among "long-haulers" is the lack of anti-inflammatory treatment that is common in hospital settings. Could early anti-inflammatory treatment during the primary disease's phase protect even mild cases from developing post-COVID syndrome?

Blood thinners are always indicated for the post-COVID syndrome, especially with risk factors such as increased age and elevated CRP. Omega 3, Melatonin, and Vitamin D might help.

Pulmonary Fibrosis is a co-morbidity and not inherent to the post-COVID syndrome.

Wearing masks will not only protect you but it will also protect others from getting infected from you - not only via aerosols but also if you breathe on objects that others might touch later. Masks should be standard as long as this virus isn't completely eradicated. They don't only help to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, but also the flu pandemic and other endemic viruses.

Ivermectin is among the safest drugs available and significantly helps against COVID-19. We're at 25 RCTs right now (ivmmeta.com). Politics seem to be more important than saving lives and shutting down the pandemic. But is this really a novel lesson? How many western wars have sacrificed human lives for political reasons without any necessity?

The FDA-approved dose of Ivermectin (i.e. 200 mcg/kg) reaches virus-inhibitory concentrations in human alveoli.

Melatonin helps with glucose-mediated inflammation and hyper-oxidation. This COVID-19-induced pathology is also prevalent in CFS/ME.

The NIH recommendations are inconceivable and outdated, even if we ignore the politicization around Ivermectin. They are completely ignoring the significance of non-pharmaceutical products for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 (e.g. Vitamins C and D). Vitamin D could be generally recommended for risk groups. This was the case even before COVID-19 started. They still won't do it. This is projectable on other western state-organic health institutions, not only the NIH.

I even lied to my doctor & still couldn't get it after saying I had threadworms. I hate my doctor.
As an end note, I liked this comment from Colin Hammill. Feels relatable. Because of the witch hunt against Ivermectin from certain institutions, it's even more difficult to get it off-label or as anti-parasitic. What's the result? These people will buy it from other sources, maybe from India or China, maybe as animal products. And there is a chance for poorer quality or fakes. These doctors should receive an award for their stubbornness.

These previous points are taken from these two webinars: