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What kind of doctor could help with nervous system disorder?

SpinachHands

Senior Member
Messages
108
Location
United Kingdom
My partner had a reaction to LDN that has caused their nervous system to go into overdrive. They're swinging between an overactive sympathetic nervous system and overactive parasympathetic. It's crashing them more and they don't seem to be improving. They were already fully bedbound and very severe before, but now they can't even rest properly.

Our GP has been no help and just wants to put them on antidepressants. I've been struggling to get hold of the pharmacist who prescribed it. The NHS ME "specialist" service they're under the care of can't do tests or prescriptions so just suggested rest.

I need someone who medically knows what they're doing, can figure out why their nervous system is in overdrive, and fix it or treat it. But I have no clue where to start, and can't afford to drop £300 on the wrong kind of doctor.

I've found a couple of private neurophysiologists, and a private doctor who specialises in vitamins/diet/chronic fatigue (not CFS). I feel like a private GP is just going to end up referring us to some kind of specialist so would rather skip past that and figure out what kind of specialist they need. They're also too unwell to do basically any kind of testing, so if they really need to push themselves to receive a blood test, I want to make sure we're testing for the right stuff.

Any suggestions on what kind of doctor could help?
 
Messages
71
Location
Scandinavia
This is not a direct answer to your question, just somthing that came to mind since your analysis is that there is a nervous system problem. Are you familiar with craniosacral therapy? A quick search for 'craniosacral' in here might help if not. It is really, really calming for the nervous system and it is all about restoring balance. It is a very gentle treatment but surprisingly powerful. It is a kind of osteopathy.

I was actually thinking both of you and your partner, thinking that you might go first to find the right practitioner and get a treat for your hard tried system yourself.

I am aware that you are not letting anyone into the the house at the moment. But maybe later on? I just wanted to add this piece of information to your big puzzle about what might help. All the best to you and your partner.
 
Last edited:
Messages
6
I've found a couple of private neurophysiologists, and a private doctor who specialises in vitamins/diet/chronic fatigue (not CFS). I feel like a private GP is just going to end up referring us to some kind of specialist so would rather skip past that and figure out what kind of specialist they need.
In my experience there is great value in finding a GP who understands chronic illnesses and is willing to do work themselves without referrals all over. I would really focus on interventions that lower sympathetic tone. I use Propranolol for a general sympathetic dampener. I still have issues with too much parasympathetic tone but there are easier techniques for helping with that. Techniques like flexing core muscles brings me back from near faints with micturition syncope, deep breathing exercises that fully fill the lungs and get a discomfort response, and temp regulation on the neck all seem to help during my wild autonomic shifts.
 

lenora

Senior Member
Messages
4,993
Yes, craniosacral therapy is good and should always be gentle. There should be no "clicking of the neck," as there are others ways of gently accomplishing the same thing. It's a gentle therapy done in a quiet environment.

It's not as harsh as chiropractic adjustments and while there may be side-effects afterwards, they aren't as bad as others.

With any new Dr. it's difficult. Your first visit is usually your best chance to present your case...that's why I always give it a lot of thought and write the most important symptoms down.

I don't know why your partner's system is in overdrive, but I would like to mention that a doctor may place him in a mental ward until this is brought under control. He'll probably be highly sedated so he can have some much needed sleep and the sedation will be lessened over time. Anyway, it's a possibility and I thought I should mention it.

I've been in a mental hospital myself and it wasn't the worst experience of my life. Most usually try to have people in and out within a week, no longer.

The craniosacral therapy may work....I hope so. I had good results from osteopaths over the years BUT they have to do this type of work on a regular basis. Good luck. Yours, Lenora
 
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