What are your fibro friendly clothes items and brands you swear by?

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It seems my clothes only last for a few months before they get holes in them and make me look disheveled. Though I have tried to fix them myself, I am horrible at it. For the sake of the doctors I see - who are quick to blame mental illness on my issues, based on how I present myself- I need to find longer lasting and halfway decent looking clothing.

Normally I get affordable stuff online from no-name brands, or occasionally from H&M, Aeropostale and Mango. Aeropostale shirts have lasted surprisingly long, but their pants are usually not for me. Either I overheat in them, or the elastic band hurts.

It would be helpful to hear if you have any favourite clothing brands, with the needs for someone with chronic illness in mind. Thanks so much.
 

hapl808

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Since brands like H&M can be cheaper to buy and throw out as opposed to genuine quality clothes that last a long time, possibly also buy a nice set of 'doctor clothes' that you wear infrequently so it stays in good condition for longer.

I also find having a bit of a 'uniform' also makes life easier when my brain might have trouble deciding what to wear, plus I personally don't have any need to worry about fashion like I used to since I'm housebound and rarely see anyone. So if there's one outfit that you can wear to a lot of things, just buy multiple versions of that.
 

Anchoress

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Rarely seen here as I live on a small island and few folk. I walk in the early morning. Abed then... I keep warm jersey atop night clothes and a kind of kaftan to slip on for walking etc. Never wear trousers. Loose is best.
 
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I wear skirts all year long(in -20 c too). In the cold season I wear one or two wool longs and wool long sleeve undergarments, a long skirt with elastic waist, knitted pullover, one or two pair of wool socks.. I sew most of my skirts and knit my own pullovers.
I guess brands of wool garments won’t help to tell, since I live in Norway. Here we have many brands who make wool undergarments, because everyone wears them.
In the summertime it’s skirt, sock or knee length support stockings , t-shirt or knitted thin wool pullover.

Wool is absolutely amazing because you don’t have to wash them so often. I just hang up them to air while I wear something else. And it keeps its shape much better than cotton, and you don’t need any ironing.

And wearing skirts one appears more dressed, and still having comfortable clothes.
 

lenora

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Between the moths, crickets and other insects that eat fabrics I'm constantly on the watch for a basic, comfortable outfit or porch dressing and especially, nightwear.

I honestly think some fabrics are just cheaper today and cotton is especially vulnerable to this. I have two white gowns that have either been made from cheap fabric or the insects are drawn to. Not even old, but suddenly holes appear....so it's not your imagination. Some of these are expensive clothes, so there is no real excuse. Complaining will sometimes help.....but good luck! They're repaired and worn until it's impossible.

Sure, you can spray or set traps but when you have severe allergies these can be dangerous.

Check garments carefully when you do buy them and I agree, keep a well put together outfit for the doctor's office. That's exactly what I do, too. B/c of nerve damage I can't tolerate anything around my waist. My husband has told me to always be comfortable....and that's fine. He isn't aware of what I wear anyway. I always have a decent hairdo and at least minimum make-up. It's a problem, I know. Yours, Lenora
 

Anchoress

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I wear skirts all year long(in -20 c too). In the cold season I wear one or two wool longs and wool long sleeve undergarments, a long skirt with elastic waist, knitted pullover, one or two pair of wool socks.. I sew most of my skirts and knit my own pullovers.
I guess brands of wool garments won’t help to tell, since I live in Norway. Here we have many brands who make wool undergarments, because everyone wears them.
In the summertime it’s skirt, sock or knee length support stockings , t-shirt or knitted thin wool pullover.

Wool is absolutely amazing because you don’t have to wash them so often. I just hang up them to air while I wear something else. And it keeps its shape much better than cotton, and you don’t need any ironing.

And wearing skirts one appears more dressed, and still having comfortable clothes.
I cannot wear wool. A severe skin allergy. When I was a child at school we all wore woolen vests ( undergarments) I used to get sent home often as every teacher dreads seeing a child with a serious body rash.. Modern synthetics are excellent. As stretchy as wool.. The mere thought of wool next to my skin makes me itch now.
 

Viala

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If you overheat it's probably because it's synthetic fabric. Cotton is natural and the best, then wool, viscose, linen, but these latter two get wrinkled a lot, so I would go with cotton. It is not easy to find cotton clothes now though or any natural fabric clothes to be honest, even in brand shops.

Unfortunately quality of all clothes goes down, shops want to earn so they will make them not durable. But if you find that it happens to most of your clothes, the problem might be your washing powder, fabric conditioner or your washing machine. Or moths. Using less washing powder might help.
 

Anchoress

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Ah no. All is well as long as I avoid wool. It really is. It was not overheating that caused the rash but a severe allergy to animal fibre, Even handling wool does it. And it was confirmed by the school doctor as a child sent home repeatedly with a body rash gets fully checked. Synthetics and cotton are fine and much easier to care for, especially as no washing machine etc, And these days they are excellent. No problem!
 
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I cannot wear wool. A severe skin allergy. When I was a child at school we all wore woolen vests ( undergarments) I used to get sent home often as every teacher dreads seeing a child with a serious body rash.. Modern synthetics are excellent. As stretchy as wool.. The mere thought of wool next to my skin makes me itch now.
And for me, synthetics make my skin crawl, itch and builds up statics. I have neuropathy and extra electric sparks are not welcome 🙈

In our family we are 3 of 5 with eczema and with modern wool undergarments we live well with no itching. Synthetic undergarments makes it worse for us.
That said, soft, non itching wool is a big thing in Norway.

So I guess, we are all different.
 

Anchoress

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All my clothes are
And for me, synthetics make my skin crawl, itch and builds up statics. I have neuropathy and extra electric sparks are not welcome 🙈

In our family we are 3 of 5 with eczema and with modern wool undergarments we live well with no itching. Synthetic undergarments makes it worse for us.
That said, soft, non itching wool is a big thing in Norway.

So I guess, we are all different.
Exactly! All different.. it is the wool itself with me. Allergy to animal fibres. In my days at junior school when we all wore wool vests they used to send me home as a child covered in a rash is bad news! Then the dr realised it was what I was wearing next to my skin.. Since then no wool is worn by me even as a top layer . These days there are so many excellent alternatives to wool,.. I wear cotton undergarments. Old age ( nearly 80) has increased sensitivity.
Vive la difference!
 

lenora

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Cotton is best for almost everyone. Flannel (cotton) in the winter and even rayon isn't a bad substitute for the likes of polyester. The latter most definitely isn't for me and rayon doesn't really wrinkle too much - it still breathes whereas polyester doesn't in a cotton climate. Even my daughters won't wear it.

Climate makes all the difference in the world, it really does. Cotton sweaters/cardigans are quite warm. Whatever works for you....go for it. I didn't realize that too much laundry detergent causes holes, always wash delicate garments on the lowest setting and hang to dry. Quality cotton really doesn't even need to be ironed but, yes, it's frustrating to find holes in it. Especially when the product is still fairly new. Yours, Lenora
 
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Oh no! I’m glad I read through all the comments first, I was going to recommend wool, Since it’s been a life changer for me. I’m in the UK, and I buy from sports pursuit, once you get an account, you can get some good clothes for much cheaper.

I also like the clothes from Uniqlo, I had some jeans that lasted for five-ish years. I also still wear a pair of pyjama bottoms. I bought about 2012 from them.

Dresses can be good for not putting pressure on your waist, but I don’t wear those LOL. i’ve been going with loose fit, high waisted trousers, and that’s been working well for me. Right now my favourite pair are corduroy as they’re nice and warm.
 
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Thanks so much for sharing your experiences. There is a lot to think about.

I have a comfortable skirt actually, so I might get more skirts. But for the winter, I'm not sure what I'd wear underneath without overheating.

I used to be fine with wool, but sadly not anymore. I break out in rashes now. I also overheat all the time, even in thin cotton. Baggy, thin fabric and pull string pants seem to be the least offending.
Such a shame I donated most of my dear clothes and watch the rest get eaten up by moths or disintegrate due to time.

I'm going to stick to cotton and patch up holes at home for as long as possible.
 

lenora

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@Amy522.....You're right with the times if you're going to stick to cotton and patch up holes for as long as possible.

There appears to be a movement afoot to have old clothing repaired and sold again. Places online do it, as does even a retailer like Eileen Fisher (at the forefront of this movement) who will take moth-holed clothes and repair them with obvious patches. People are picking up on this trend and it's quite fashionable (so to speak).

I don't need many clothes any longer, but I still like my flannel nightgowns in winter and pure cotton long sleeved gowns in the summer. I was in favor of different looking garb in my youth, but comfort beats all....and comfort now dictates what I wear.

Long sleeves can at least be pushed up....short or 3/4 length are almost useless. Newer and cheaper cottons don't wear as well as they should. I think I may have an insect problem here and they're attracted to cotton. Definitely not moths, as they're busy munching on sweaters elsewhere in the closet. Another reason not to buy expensive clothes.

I used to buy Eileen West (note difference in surnames) gowns that were as light as air and were beautiful cotton. The ones you can buy in the stores or catalogs (Vermont Country Store still carries fairly decent ones) are often of a heavier cotton....not great for where I live. However, E-bay or Etsy will often have resales of older gowns that tend to wear well. A warning though....some people get the label somehow and the cotton used is heavier and doesn't hang as well. So be careful of that for your own sake.

Anyway, I give my clothing away and will continue to do so, but there are people who are selling online. It's amazing how much is wasted in textiles alone each year. I just shopped for some of my hubby's Xmas presents...on Etsy. The Salvation Army would also be good, Oxfam Shops....I just do what I can and my daughters follow suit. Grandchildren have a different mindset....and really, I guess they should for at least awhile. Shoes must be another matter entirely. Everything is washed by me. That way it's definitely mine. Yours, Lenora
 
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