Welding Fume: A Few Important Things to Consider

antares4141

Senior Member
Messages
554
Likes
769
Location
Truth or consequences, nm
For instance, workers may develop metal fume fever that presents as flu-like symptoms and lasts 24-48 hours. Additionally, short-term exposures to significant levels of welding fumes and gases can result in eye, nose and throat irritation, dizziness and nausea, which is also commonly known as Welder’s sickness. Long-term overexposure to welding fume can cause lung damage and other serious health effects. Again, the science behind understanding the effects of welding fume is evolving.
https://workersafety.3m.com/welding...qLW9l8OgMByNmbbUcxqgWOH2ApAQjKX_JaHLL980hP4r4

These symptoms can be brought on by so many different mechanisms, the above just being one of many.

Why do authority figures automatically go to the it's psychosomatic explanation? Even when you tell them about your suspicions what might be the cause? Even when millions of other people with similar experiences come to them with identical presentations.

Why is the knowledge surrounding exposures like these and the resulting syndromes so poorly investigated and understood? When there are so many things they could do to recognize the pathology, identify, prevent, and treat it?

How come 800,000 to 2 million people spend the rest of their lives suffering in silence, having to fight to get put on disability, never getting any relief from medical science instead having to go to the internet to get support, and research their situation for themselves?
 

geraldt52

Senior Member
Messages
589
Likes
2,359
...How come 800,000 to 2 million people spend the rest of their lives suffering in silence, having to fight to get put on disability, never getting any relief from medical science instead having to go to the internet to get support, and research their situation for themselves?
Because it's perceived as being cheaper. And, the general public doesn't care about things that aren't affecting them, or they don't feel threatened by.
 

Mary

Moderator Resource
Messages
16,152
Likes
36,544
Location
Southern California
I believe the answer is money. Why is Roundup used everywhere with no regard for the harm it causes? Money, money, money. Who writes the regulations? Those with the most money. Why are bee-killing pesticides so widely used? Money, money, money. Companies are making big money off of our lives and health. And that's who legislators listen to.
 

percyval577

geometrical disaster
Messages
1,281
Likes
1,723
Location
Ik waak up
I believe the answer is money. Why is Roundup used everywhere with no regard for the harm it causes? Money, money, money. Who writes the regulations? Those with the most money. Why are bee-killing pesticides so widely used? Money, money, money. Companies are making big money off of our lives and health. And that's who legislators listen to.
Kat´s wisdom at its best.
 

Mary

Moderator Resource
Messages
16,152
Likes
36,544
Location
Southern California
Here's an article from 2 days ago in the NY Times about how corporate lobbyists influenced the implementation and final outcome of Trump's tax cuts: How Big Companies Won New Tax Breaks From the Trump Administration:

Starting in early 2018, senior officials in President Trump’s Treasury Department were swarmed by lobbyists seeking to insulate companies from the few parts of the tax law that would have required them to pay more. The crush of meetings was so intense that some top Treasury officials had little time to do their jobs, according to two people familiar with the process.

The lobbyists targeted a pair of major new taxes that were supposed to raise hundreds of billions of dollars from companies that had been avoiding taxes in part by claiming their profits were earned outside the United States.

The blitz was led by a cross section of the world’s largest companies, including Anheuser-Busch, Credit Suisse, General Electric, United Technologies, Barclays, Coca-Cola, Bank of America, UBS, IBM, Kraft Heinz, Kimberly-Clark, News Corporation, Chubb, ConocoPhillips, HSBC and the American International Group.

Thanks in part to the chaotic manner in which the bill was rushed through Congress — a situation that gave the Treasury Department extra latitude to interpret a law that was, by all accounts, sloppily written — the corporate lobbying campaign was a resounding success.
I'm sure similar lobbying efforts are carried out whenever legislation affecting major corporations is proposed.