Weight loss via exercise harder for obese people, data suggests

Treeman

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Losing weight through exercise appears to be more difficult for obese people, research suggests.

Initially, researchers thought that the total energy we spend in a day is the sum of energy expended due to activity (ranging from light gardening to running a marathon) and energy used for basic functioning (what keeps us ticking even when we are doing nothing, such as immune function and wound healing).

But preliminary lab research indicates that that simple addition could be misleading – estimates of total daily expenditure tend to be less than the sum of baseline and activity expenditure in individuals

To explore this further, a group of international scientists analysed measurements of energy expenditure from 1,754 adults from a dataset collected over decades and supplied by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

They found that increasing levels of activity by exercising more, for instance, led to each person’s body compensating by limiting the energy expended on basic metabolic functions over a longer period, according to the study published in the journal Current Biology."

Weight loss via exercise harder for obese people, data suggests | Obesity | The Guardian

Could this explain why pwme have flair up's of symptoms after using more energy then is in their "envelope"?

I had previously looked in to kynurenine and discovered research on obese people who also have low amounts. Could this be a common thread to consider?
 

Pyrrhus

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They found that increasing levels of activity by exercising more, for instance, led to each person’s body compensating by limiting the energy expended on basic metabolic functions over a longer period, according to the study published in the journal Current Biology.
Thanks for sharing! This provides more evidence that clinical obesity is a neuroendocrine disorder, not a "lifestyle choice".

It also provides more support for the "set-point theory" of weight management, which posits that when you eat more or less, or exercise more or less, the body compensates to maintain a constant weight "set-point".

It also helps to explain how there is a lot of evidence that improving one's diet and exercising more leads to better health, while there is comparatively little evidence that improving one's diet and exercising more leads to a lower weight.

Could this explain why pwme have flair up's of symptoms after using more energy then is in their "envelope"?
Although both clinical obesity and ME are marked by the prominent symptom of exercise intolerance, I think the physiological mechanisms behind the exercise intolerance are different in each condition.