UK CMRC Conference Newcastle 13-14 October 2015

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Sasha

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I've searched and googled and can't find that there's already a thread on this, amazingly.

Just read this on the MEA's site - look, there'll be livestreaming!!!

Not quite sure of what. Is it the whole conference, @charles shepherd?

http://www.meassociation.org.uk/201...newcastle-cmrc-conference-13-14-october-2015/

MEA said:
Interact with ME/CFS scientific researchers | Newcastle CMRC conference | 13-14 October 2015
People who fancy interacting with science researchers can do so later this year – when the UK CFS/ME Research Collaborative holds its second scientific meeting at the Newcastle Novotel on October 13-14.

Non-researchers can join the collaborative by becoming associate members. The Twitter home for the event is #CMRC2015.

There will be a workshop on patient-reported outcome measures, facilitated by Dr Kirstie Haywood, senior research fellow (patient-reported outcomes) in the Division of Health Sciences, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick.

Prof Liz Perkins will deliver a presentation on social policy research and M.E, plus there will be updated on current research funded by the Medical Research Council. This will be followed by a Q&A session, giving Associate Members the chance to discuss researcher’s work with them.

You must be an Associate Member to attend and registration is free. Associate Members don’t have to be researchers – anyone with an interest in M.E. can become one.

Livestreaming will be available so Associate Members unable to attend can catch the event online from home.

Prof José Montoya from Stanford University, California, will be joining the event as keynote speaker in the session on neuropathology. The ME Association is helping with the cost of bringing over overseas speakers, including Prof Montoya.

Other speakers will include Prof Jo Nijs (autonomic system), Dr Øystein Fluge (Rituximab Trial), Prof Jim Horne (sleep), Prof George Davey Smith (big data, genomics, epigenetics and metabolomics).

Chairs of individual sessions include Prof Julia Newton, Prof Hugh Perry, Dr Esther Crawley and CMRC chair Prof Stephen Holgate.

Register to attend #CMRC2015 online here (where you can also check out the programme):www.eventzilla.net/web/event?eventid=2139069963

Sign up as an Associate Member here: www.meassociation.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/cmrc-membership-form.docx
 
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Other speakers will include Prof Jo Nijs (autonomic system), Dr Øystein Fluge (Rituximab Trial), Prof Jim Horne (sleep), Prof George Davey Smith (big data, genomics, epigenetics and metabolomics).
Delighted to see Rituximab featuring at the CMRC conference, and even more pleased to see George Davey Smith is coming to the party. He's a really interesting thinker, and just the kind of scientist we need to bolster the field in the UK - a highly respected researcher.

Profile: George Davey Smith - insight (MRC)
George Davey Smith was away on unauthorised holiday cycling around Ireland when his counterparts at Cambridge medical school were taught about epidemiology.

Returning the day before the epidemiology module test, he received some limited instruction from friends in the pub, and then did better in the epidemiology test than in other parts of the course. “I realised this was something for me,” he says.
Plus more serious stuff, Professor George Davey Smith - School of Social and Community Medicine (Bristol University)

He's probably best-known for his work on "How our genes conduct radomised trials "


He co-authored and interesting 2007 article with Esther Crawley: Is chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS/ME) heritable in children, and if so, why does it matter? which I thought showed unusual clarity in this field, and even discussed problems of lack of correction when making many comparisions, a real problem with mecfs genetics studies.
 

Bob

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He co-authored and interesting 2007 article with Esther Crawley: Is chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS/ME) heritable in children, and if so, why does it matter? which I thought showed unusual clarity in this field, and even discussed problems of lack of correction when making many comparisions, a real problem with mecfs genetics studies.
That's interesting. And would probably explain Crawley's recent comments in the media re heritability, which surprised me:
http://forums.phoenixrising.me/inde...fury-at-child-abuse-claims.38242/#post-610294
 
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