Thyroid hormone and collagen

Alvin2

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Interesting study.
That said if your thyroid hormone levels are normal then this won't be the cause of your problems.
 

Learner1

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Would this be a potential link to people with collagen issues or connective tissue like issues who are not EDS?
Interesting study.
That said if your thyroid hormone levels are normal then this won't be the cause of your problems.
What is considered normal varies considerably depending on who you are talking to. Unfortunately endocrinologists and other doctors seem to practice these days based on Synthroid dogma, which teaches doctors that only TSH, a pituitary hormone, should be used to determine thyroid levels.

This has led many patients to have horrendous symptoms and long-term health consequences, when it would be more useful for many patients to measure FT3 (The active thyroid hormone), FT4 (The inactive hormone it converts from), reverse T3 (The inactive hormone that T4 sometimes converts to rather than T3), and TPO and thyroglobulin antibodies (which can affect use of thyroid hormones as the thyroid gland is being destroyed).

By doing these tests, one can figure out what a patient really needs to be able to optimize thyroid, which should optimize collagen production and bone health, according to the article. However, there are also a number of other factors affecting both that are not thyroid related.

The Thyroid Patients Canada blog and FB group has a lot of helpful information about thyroid management and thyroid health, based upon a huge amount of thyroid research.
 
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Viala

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Very interesting study, links CFS rT3 theory with Jen's Brea collagen issues theory, calcification that may lead to brainstem and spine compressing conditions, and light therapy on top of it.
 

judyinthesky

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What is considered normal various considerably depending on who you are talking to. Unfortunately endocrinologists and other doctors seem to practice these days based on Synthroid dogma, which teaches doctors that only TSH, a pituitary hormone, should be used to determine thyroid levels.

This has led many patients to have horrendous symptoms and long-term health consequences, when it would be more useful for many patients to measure FT3 (The active thyroid hormone), FT4 (The inactive hormone it converts from), reverse T3 (The inactive hormone that T4 sometimes converts to rather than T3), and TPO and thyroglobulin antibodies (which can affect use of thyroid hormones as the thyroid gland is being destroyed).

By doing these tests, one can figure out what a patient really needs to be able to optimize thyroid, which should optimize collagen production and bone health, according to the article. However, there are also a number of other factors affecting both that are not thyroid related.

The Thyroid Patients Canada blog and FB group has a lot of helpful information about thyroid management and thyroid health, based upon a huge amount of thyroid research.
I've unfortunately had always low FT3 after my thyroidectomy, tried all of the avaliable T3 medications and unfortunately my body doesn't do well on it. It wires me. However I've always known that this cannot be a good thing.
I also never knew why my FT3 was low in the first place. Just that I developed pancreas insufficiency after a while, so it could be tied to my gut.
Contrary to popular Internet theory on thyroid (which I made my dissertation by the way), I don't have too high cortisol, and I've seen many people not being able to tolerate T3.
So there seems to be a bit of a catch 22..
 

Learner1

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I've unfortunately had always low FT3 after my thyroidectomy, tried all of the avaliable T3 medications and unfortunately my body doesn't do well on it. It wires me. However I've always known that this cannot be a good thing.
I also never knew why my FT3 was low in the first place. Just that I developed pancreas insufficiency after a while, so it could be tied to my gut.
Contrary to popular Internet theory on thyroid (which I made my dissertation by the way), I don't have too high cortisol, and I've seen many people not being able to tolerate T3.
So there seems to be a bit of a catch 22..
Many people are given T4 after thyroidectomy, which is then converted to T3. Many people on T3 take multiple tiny doses. T3 is a natural substance needed throughout our bodies. It's unlikely one can't tolerate it at all, though it is possible to be allergic to ingredients in the preparation, and it is possible to need smaller doses more frequently. Some people also do well on NDT, natural dessicated thyroid.
 

judyinthesky

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Many people are given T4 after thyroidectomy, which is then converted to T3. Many people on T3 take multiple tiny doses. T3 is a natural substance needed throughout our bodies. It's unlikely one can't tolerate it at all, though it is possible to be allergic to ingredients in the preparation, and it is possible to need smaller doses more frequently. Some people also do well on NDT, natural dessicated thyroid.
Believe me, I've tried them all, even in the retarded smallest avaliable version. Only taken smaller doses. Maybe it is my pancreas illness, maybe my gastritis, maybe my wired system, but I can't take it. When I've taken it I also didn't notice benefits apart from the wiredness. I would consider the idea that some people are so sensitive. Before I came down with ME I was also able to tolerate it a bit easier. I can't take most other activating medication also.
I've taken supplements to up the ft3 a bit. I am not sure whether the ft3 level reacts to my wiredness, but it could well be.
Maybe low ft3 could even be an expression of brain inflammation of any kind (long shot).