The Role of the Vagus Nerve in Fibromyalgia Syndrome

Shanti1

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The Role of the Vagus Nerve in Fibromyalgia Syndrome
Daniel F Martins 1, et al.
Neurosci Biobehav Rev
2021 Oct 25;S0149-7634(21)00463-2.
PMID: 34710514 DOI: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2021.10.021
Abstract
Fibromyalgia (FM) syndrome is a common illness characterized by chronic widespread pain, sleep problems, fatigue, and cognitive difficulties. Dysfunctional neurotransmitter systems that influence the body's endogenous stress response systems are thought to underlie many of the major FM-related symptoms. A model of FM pathogenesis suggests biological and psychosocial variables interact to influence the genetic predisposition, but the precise mechanisms remain unclear. The Polyvagal Theory provides a theoretical framework from which to investigate potential biological mechanisms. The vagus nerve (VN) has anti-inflammatory properties via its afferent and efferent fibers. A low vagal tone (as assessed by low heart rate variability), has been observed in painful and inflammatory diseases, including FM, while the ventral branch of the VN is linked to emotional expression and social engagement. These anti-inflammatory and psychological (limbic system) properties of the VN may possess therapeutic potential in treating FM. This review paper summarizes the scientific literature regarding the potential role of the VN in transducing and/or therapeutically managing FM signs and symptoms.
 

Pyrrhus

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SWAlexander

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The Role of the Vagus Nerve in Fibromyalgia Syndrome
Daniel F Martins 1, et al.
Neurosci Biobehav Rev
2021 Oct 25;S0149-7634(21)00463-2.
PMID: 34710514 DOI: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2021.10.021
Abstract
Fibromyalgia (FM) syndrome is a common illness characterized by chronic widespread pain, sleep problems, fatigue, and cognitive difficulties. Dysfunctional neurotransmitter systems that influence the body's endogenous stress response systems are thought to underlie many of the major FM-related symptoms. A model of FM pathogenesis suggests biological and psychosocial variables interact to influence the genetic predisposition, but the precise mechanisms remain unclear. The Polyvagal Theory provides a theoretical framework from which to investigate potential biological mechanisms. The vagus nerve (VN) has anti-inflammatory properties via its afferent and efferent fibers. A low vagal tone (as assessed by low heart rate variability), has been observed in painful and inflammatory diseases, including FM, while the ventral branch of the VN is linked to emotional expression and social engagement. These anti-inflammatory and psychological (limbic system) properties of the VN may possess therapeutic potential in treating FM. This review paper summarizes the scientific literature regarding the potential role of the VN in transducing and/or therapeutically managing FM signs and symptoms.
I´m very glad you bring up the vagus nerve. It´s multi function is most of the time overlooked.
May I ad this: https://teachmeanatomy.info/head/cranial-nerves/vagus-nerve-cn-x/
 

Pyrrhus

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But seriously, I am not impressed with the psycho-babble:
A model of FM pathogenesis suggests biological and psychosocial variables interact
the ventral branch of the VN is linked to emotional expression and social engagement.
Huh, what?

They're trying to link a peripheral autonomic nerve to "emotional expression and social engagement"?! :bang-head:
 
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They're trying to link a peripheral autonomic nerve to "emotional expression and social engagement"?! :bang-head:
Oddly, I can sort of, very vaguely, if I squint real hard, see the ghostly outline (what can I say .... tis the season) of a semi connection .....


The connection between the enteric nervous system and the brain and CNS via the vagus nerve is what causes sensations like 'gut feelings', irrational fears, and adverse reactions that have no explanation, which if acted on can lead to a chnage of emotional expression and social expression. I call it the Dr Fell response, a little rhyme I learned at my mama's knee:

I do not like thee Dr Fell
And why I don't
I cannot tell
But this I know
And know full well
I do not like thee, Dr Fell

Yeah, it's a stretch, but all that does have some interesting basis in reality. Even if the researchers couldn;t pinpoint it or call it out, you know, rationally ....

EDIT ... for weird little typos, aggravated by this tiny little $%%#@#$%^ back-up laptop I'm working on .... and for which I'm bery, bery grateful, or I'd be going nuts starting day before yesterday :confused::confused:o_O ....
 
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