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The Patient Will See You Now: The Future of Medicine is in Your Hands

undiagnosed

Senior Member
Messages
246
Location
United States
Hey everyone,

I was doing some research for a paper I am working on and came across the book, The Patient Will See You Now: The Future of Medicine is in Your Hands by Eric Topol. I've skimmed through it a little and it looks like the author presents a lot of thoughts that are similar to my own. I was wondering if anyone here has read it or wanted to discuss it? The book is on libgen.io and bookzz.org if you're a downloader.

Eric also has the following table on his Twitter page that I think is a good summary of how things are changing and will continue to change.

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Groggy Doggy

Guest
Messages
1,130
Looking at ideas and opportunities to improve they way we get health care is a recent passion of mine. If I was well enough, I would attend Stanford Medicine X conference, which will address may novel approaches. Personally, I am tired of hearing about well people designing health care systems, when the majority of input should really come from the experts, sick people.

Here is an abstract from one of the oral presentations at Medicine X:

Breaking the medical cartel – patient ordered tests and treatments
Gregory Schmidt, MD


Since time immemorial, a small group of individuals has controlled medical knowledge. Be it the shaman, the medicine man, or the doctor, the practice of medicine has been restricted and secretive. The medical cartel, however, will come to an end this decade.

In this session, I will demonstrate why it is essential that patients be given the ability to order their own investigations and treatments. You are not alone in thinking such a proposal seems ill-conceived and a disaster waiting to happen. However, I will show why this is an essential step towards creating space for the development of new models of health care delivery.

The current system of physician-centered health care evolved to protect patients from nineteenth century quackery. Today patients continue to demand trustworthy care; however, there are new ways to verify authenticity. I will show how the clash between the current medical model and potential future models will only be amplified once home diagnostic tests are more widely available and computer algorithms and machine intelligence has matured.

Many within healthcare anticipate that new artificial intelligence-aided diagnostic tools will be used only by qualified clinicians. However, this is akin to limiting Google Search to select university professors. In almost every field outside of medicine, access to knowledge and tools for implementation have been democratized and made almost free. Advances in diagnostics and machine learning will help do the same for medicine; but we must create a regulatory environment where this can happen.

In addition to new technologies, one can expect better personal relationships in health care. New ‘para-physician’ fields will emerge. Rather than studying for 15 years to become a physician, new specialists may train for a few years to become qualified in a specific domain – such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and lifestyle change. Such providers would cost significantly less than physicians, and provide more effective longitudinal care. The current system prevents such fields from emerging.

This presentation will address many unanswered questions. Where does this leave the physician? How do we help prevent patients from being duped by online scams? Is my headache a brain tumour? Will this system be fragmented and contradictory? Will antibiotic use skyrocket? Who is responsible for following up on test results? Who pays for this?

Explore the potential opportunities and risks that could result from fracturing the physician monopoly over health care and giving patients the ability to order their own tests and treatments.
 

undiagnosed

Senior Member
Messages
246
Location
United States
@Groggy Doggy, that presentation sounds very interesting. I'd like to hear more about the presenter's thoughts. In the excerpt he mentions that we must create a regulatory environment where this can happen. Such regulatory changes will undoubtedly lag significantly behind what is technically possible. I am exploring ideas from a position of ways to work around existing regulations.
 
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Groggy Doggy

Guest
Messages
1,130
@Groggy Doggy, that presentation sounds very interesting. I'd like to hear more about the presenter's thoughts. In the excerpt he mentions that we must create a regulatory environment where this can happen. Such regulatory changes will undoubtedly lag significantly behind what is technically possible. I am exploring ideas from a position of ways to work around existing regulations.
Here is a list of Abstracts (some you may find interesting)
 

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undiagnosed

Senior Member
Messages
246
Location
United States
People need to be a lot better educated about their own bodies. Physicians shouldn't be the only ones who know this stuff.

I agree for many people that is the case, but even if they were more educated, it wouldn't solve the problem in the existing system. The following excerpt from The Patient Will See You Now: The Future of Medicine is in Your Hands describes the plight of the smart patient.

Patients are intrinsically remarkably smart—they know their own bodies
and the context of their lives—and no one has a bigger interest in their own
health. That doesn’t mean, however, that they do all (or any of) the right
things to stay healthy, but when things do go wrong, they are pretty darn
good at detecting a problem. [6],[16–18] But we’ve learned that, in general, doc-
tors don’t like smart patients. In fact, a recent study of physician attitudes
found that: “patients who have in- depth knowledge of their condition en-
counter problems when their expertise is seen as inappropriate in standard
healthcare interactions.” [6]