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Tachycardia palpitation attack after sleep?

Do you often experience it?

  • Yes

    Votes: 6 66.7%
  • No

    Votes: 3 33.3%

  • Total voters
    9
Messages
419
Likes
363
Location
southeast asia
I want to collect information about this condition since more than 15 years ago when it started.

Its weird when i just woken up after sleeping(still on bed) i get this attack (tachy, palp) for some minutes. sometimes short sometimes long. And its not because of a dream. Im in relax state instead.

I know some people experience it, ive been reading about some theory long ago but still unclear and i havent known if theres an update.

Does anyone know why it happens and how to fix it?(doctor dont know what disease it correlated to, they only thought anxiety, pots isnt known here, so i dont know what i have due to this)

Some theory ive been reading but i still cant quite find my exact own solution/culprit:
-blood sugar
-apnea
-dysautonomia
-blood pressure
-cortisol
-hormonal
-dehydration
-reflux

Im not sweating, tried lifting my pillow, check bp, eating to avoid hypoglycemia, drinking, ive had apnea before but it didnt caused same symptoms i think, i have gerd too but when it attacks/even when my throat is burning it didnt caused it.(when it happened i didnt feel reflux)
checking blood sugar with home device around the time it happens but seems ok i think.

It only happened occasionally before but this recent years it happened almost always. I have to depend on drugs(bb but results vary). The duration and intensity are also vary. (Of course it correlated with my condition, when im in better state or worse.)

Ive tried exercising also since some say its due to adrenaline dump due to dysautonomia.

Still im so lost. :(
 
Last edited:
Messages
419
Likes
363
Location
southeast asia
it's happening before you sit up?
Of course. Just woken up. And if i sleep again wake up again it happened again.

Sometimes it happened only after i sleep for hours.

I remember when it started i just turn side on bed and it acting up. I thought it only due to minimal activity but then it happens even when i dont do exertion/activity.
 

bjl218

Senior Member
Messages
145
Likes
160
Location
Chelmsford, Massachusetts
Does it stop when you stand up or sit up? Do you know for a fact that it's tachycardia vs some other sensation that feels like tachycardia? In other words, you've measured your heart rate and know that it's elevated? Do you experience any stomach issues when this happens: feel bloated or any pressure in your stomach or near your sternum?
 
Messages
419
Likes
363
Location
southeast asia
Does it stop when you stand up or sit up? Do you know for a fact that it's tachycardia vs some other sensation that feels like tachycardia? In other words, you've measured your heart rate and know that it's elevated? Do you experience any stomach issues when this happens: feel bloated or any pressure in your stomach or near your sternum?
It usually gets worse if i move around as it requires more exortion.
i got tachy, palp issues since a child so im very familiar to it.(i also have ecg handheld monitor) Also when it happens i can feel it thumps so hard and fast.

Mostly i dont notice stomach issues during it. but since i do have stomach issues sometimes there is.
 

brenda

Senior Member
Messages
2,154
Likes
1,767
Location
UK
It sometimes happens because the liver is not well enough to store glycogen through the night, so you get an adrenal rush when BS dips.

One way to help it is by taking orange juice + a little salt by the bedside to take when one awakens.
 
Messages
419
Likes
363
Location
southeast asia
It sometimes happens because the liver is not well enough to store glycogen through the night, so you get an adrenal rush when BS dips.

One way to help it is by taking orange juice + a little salt by the bedside to take when one awakens.
When should i take it? Before sleep? Orange juice (the sweet orange or sour orange only, i guess the citrus ones)?
 

brenda

Senior Member
Messages
2,154
Likes
1,767
Location
UK
When should i take it? Before sleep? Orange juice (the sweet orange or sour orange only, i guess the citrus ones)?
Pure 100% ordinary sweet orange juice with one eighth tsp salt added, taken before sleeping, about half a cup and then a few sips when one wakes, l take some water as well to rinse the mouth afterwards. It lowers adrenal pretty quickly.
 
Messages
11
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23
Does it stop when you stand up or sit up? Do you know for a fact that it's tachycardia vs some other sensation that feels like tachycardia? In other words, you've measured your heart rate and know that it's elevated? Do you experience any stomach issues when this happens: feel bloated or any pressure in your stomach or near your sternum?
Apologies for reviving an old thread, but why do you ask this? I’ve had heart palpitations and a constant bounding heart (it feels like my heart is working extra hard all the time, though my heart rate isn’t that high) since I had a small stomach upset (and I also have SIBO), and I constantly feel bloated/like it’s hard to take it a deep breath from my diaphragm, my chest feels tight...I can’t work out why.
 

bjl218

Senior Member
Messages
145
Likes
160
Location
Chelmsford, Massachusetts
I asked because sometimes other conditions can feel like tachycardia. For example, if you have reflux and your lower esophageal sphincter (LES) starts spasming, this can feel like tachycardia. This can often stop if you've been lying down and then sit or stand up. I experienced this for a while. I figured out that it wasn't tachycardia because I started using a PulseOx device to monitor my heart rate which didn't change significantly during these episodes.

I asked about the stomach issues because of the above and the fact that digestive issues (especially those that cause bloating) can end up causing the LES to put pressure on the vagus nerve which can then cause tachycardia and other symptoms.
 

BeADocToGoTo1

Senior Member
Messages
522
Likes
845
Have you tested for nutrient deficiencies or any form of malabsorption which can cause nutrient deficiencies?

For example, CoQ10, L-Carnitine, Magnesium were ones that helped my heart issues a great deal.

Some tests to consider:

1. Genova Diagnostics - FMV - Gives a great overall picture of nutrient deficiencies, neurotransmitter metabolites, microbiome dysbiosis, pancreatic enzyme issues, and many more. Biochemistry and metabolomics in practice. This test should be standard for all primary care and family practice doctors as a regular preventative maintenance test, and for anything chronic or hard to diagnose. Great Plains Laboratories has similar tests.

2. Genova Diagnostics - Comprehensive Digestive Stool Analysis 2.0 with Parasitology (microbiome dysbiosis indicators), Fecal Fat Distribution (checks if you have issues with different types of fat intake and digestion), Elastase (for EPI, pancreas enzyme marker)and Chymotrypsin (for EPI, pancreas enzyme marker). Doctor's Data has similar tests.

3. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) breath test, for example, Commonwealth Diagnostics International. But the first one will also provide you with SIBO indicators.

But also look at HbA1c as a quick, standard indicator of excess sugar intake which impacts your microbiome, pancreas functioning amongst many other things. 5.2% or lower is what I strive for.

In my case it was pancreas damage that caused nutrient deficiencies and wild blood sugar fluctuations. When my blood sugar dropped too low, it would cause adrenaline dump wake-ups in utter panic from deep sleep with subsequent heart rhythm issues. In addition, due to micro-nutrient deficiencies my heart would sometimes be in the low 20s bpm, and then start racing again, skip every 3rd or 4th beat, etc..

There are many reasons for malabsorption and nutrient deficiencies so it would be good to rule out things like exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI), small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), Candida yeast overgrowth, food sensitivities or allergies, gluten sensititivity, Chrohn's etc.
 
Last edited:

sunshine44

Senior Member
Messages
762
Likes
2,623
yes, I absolutely get this, its horrific and has really wreaked havoc in my life. I have been having nightly epsiodes for almost a year now.

It seems to involve moving for me and I have tried to rule out so many things as well.
 
Messages
419
Likes
363
Location
southeast asia
I havent check this in a while cause i feel hopeless :(
Still couldnt find the culprit.

I asked because sometimes other conditions can feel like tachycardia. For example, if you have reflux and your lower esophageal sphincter (LES) starts spasming, this can feel like tachycardia. This can often stop if you've been lying down and then sit or stand up. I experienced this for a while. I figured out that it wasn't tachycardia because I started using a PulseOx device to monitor my heart rate which didn't change significantly during these episodes.

I asked about the stomach issues because of the above and the fact that digestive issues (especially those that cause bloating) can end up causing the LES to put pressure on the vagus nerve which can then cause tachycardia and other symptoms.
Mine definitely not from stomach muscle cause i got handheld ecg. And my heart beat so hard out of my chest so i can clearly tell the difference.
Have you tested for nutrient deficiencies or any form of malabsorption which can cause nutrient deficiencies?

For example, CoQ10, L-Carnitine, Magnesium were ones that helped my heart issues a great deal.

Some tests to consider:

1. Genova Diagnostics - FMV - Gives a great overall picture of nutrient deficiencies, neurotransmitter metabolites, microbiome dysbiosis, pancreatic enzyme issues, and many more. Biochemistry and metabolomics in practice. This test should be standard for all primary care and family practice doctors as a regular preventative maintenance test, and for anything chronic or hard to diagnose. Great Plains Laboratories has similar tests.

2. Genova Diagnostics - Comprehensive Digestive Stool Analysis 2.0 with Parasitology (microbiome dysbiosis indicators), Fecal Fat Distribution (checks if you have issues with different types of fat intake and digestion), Elastase (for EPI, pancreas enzyme marker)and Chymotrypsin (for EPI, pancreas enzyme marker). Doctor's Data has similar tests.

3. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) breath test, for example, Commonwealth Diagnostics International. But the first one will also provide you with SIBO indicators.

But also look at HbA1c as a quick, standard indicator of excess sugar intake which impacts your microbiome, pancreas functioning amongst many other things. 5.2% or lower is what I strive for.

In my case it was pancreas damage that caused nutrient deficiencies and wild blood sugar fluctuations. When my blood sugar dropped too low, it would cause adrenaline dump wake-ups in utter panic from deep sleep with subsequent heart rhythm issues. In addition, due to micro-nutrient deficiencies my heart would sometimes be in the low 20s bpm, and then start racing again, skip every 3rd or 4th beat, etc..

There are many reasons for malabsorption and nutrient deficiencies so it would be good to rule out things like exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI), small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), Candida yeast overgrowth, food sensitivities or allergies, gluten sensititivity, Chrohn's etc.
Thank you for th informative post.
i take q10 and magnesium.
My hba1c test is normal.
But sometimes i got hypoglycemic symptoms when im at my worst/havent eat for some hours. And i got palpitation after eating sweet food.