Study finds hemorrhagic brain disease caused by gut bacteria metabolite

PatJ

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I'm not sure if this has been posted before.

Considering how gut bacteria might be connected with ME/CFS I thought some of our members might be interested in this article on NewAtlas: Study finds hemorrhagic brain disease caused by gut bacteria metabolite.

Some excerpts:
A milestone study published in the journal Nature Communications is offering the first demonstration of a direct causal relationship between the gut microbiome and a human neurovascular disease. Verifying prior animal studies, the research suggests a microbiome metabolite can travel through the bloodstream, reach blood vessels in the brain and expedite the development of lesions.
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The researchers collected fecal samples from over 100 CA patients and discovered the condition did correlate with a very particular microbiome signature. Levels of three common species particularly distinguished CA patients from a healthy control. Higher than normal levels of Odoribacter splanchnicus were seen in CA patients, alongside lower levels of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Bifidobacterium adolescentis.

"The CA patients from all the different collection sites had the same distinctive microbiome, regardless of whether they had inherited the mutation or had a sporadic lesion, and regardless of the number of lesions they had," explains Awad.

Further analysis revealed the specific CA-microbiome signature identified in the human subjects resulted in heightened synthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules. Prior mouse studies have found LPS molecules produced in the gut can travel through the bloodstream into the brain and drive the development of CA lesions.

Sean Polster, first author on the new study, says analyzing microbial populations in tandem with a number of blood-based biomarkers resulted in incredibly accurate diagnoses of CA severity.

"By looking at both bacteria combinations and the blood biomarkers, we were able to measure just how aggressive the disease was in each patient," adds Polster.
 

ljimbo423

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Thanks @PatJ for posting this study.

The gut microbiome is truly incredibly complicated and complex. I think this is why researchers are having such a hard time connecting systemic symptoms in ME/CFS to the gut microbiome.

Moving forward, the researchers are hesitant to suggest some kind of probiotic treatment could be effective in managing this kind of neurovascular disease.

Awad particularly notes, the broader systemic effects of the gut microbiome can be unpredictable, so trying to alter levels of one or two types of bacteria could lead to other kinds of health problems. The microbiome, “is more complicated than it appears,” adds Awad.
 
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Ditto, @PatJ , interesting article outtakes, and thank you for them .... will read the article when brain function kicks in again .....

@ljimbo423 ..... I can;t remember if I actually remembered to post this for you:

10% Human: How Your Body’s Microbes Hold the Key to Health and Happiness ,
by: Alanna Collen ….very good

If I'm remembering correctly, and I won't mention again what the odds on that are, this is a really, really good look at the microbiome and it's incredibly intersticed connections to absolutely everything in your body and life generally.

 

ljimbo423

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10% Human: How Your Body’s Microbes Hold the Key to Health and Happiness ,
by: Alanna Collen ….very good
Thanks Yippee!

I wish I could afford it. I took a look at it on Amazon and it sounds like something I'd like. For many years I have read about how the gut microbiome can cause or contribute to numerous diseases, as well as depression, anxiety and other neurological problems.

I think the huge role it has in so many disorders and diseases is greatly underestimated or ignored all together. Even as more and more research, every year, continues to point to the gut as the cause or a major contributor to these things.

I'd sure like to know what's it's like to live with a very healthy gut microbiome! I don't think I've ever had one. I'm quite sure my life would be drastically different!!
 
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I wish I could afford it.
Check out Thriftbooks.com ..... they sell used and very lightly used books for $, and I've hd very good luc with them. The books arrive quickly for the most part, and are in exactly the condition advertised.

Alternately, maybe you can get it thru your library's on-line service?

It's really worth a browse ....:thumbsup::thumbsup: :hug: