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Sterile Methylcobalamin Powder

Messages
69
Hi everyone, in 2022 Oxford Biosciences switched suppliers of their sterile methylcobalamin powder (used for IM injection). After the switch, their product no longer works for me and feels "dirty" in my system. For nine months now, I've been trying to track down a new source as my health has deteriorated significantly.

There is a legal barrier in the U.S. where pure MeB12 cannot be obtained except by pharmacies. I have looked all over the world and cannot find a source anywhere. My life depends on this and I'm up against a wall. No other form seems to work for me (I have tried many), and I know that product was unique because I found an old vial in the back of my B12 drawer (from pre-2022 switch). My health instantly went to 100%, then dropped again when that vial ran out.

Praying for a miracle here....
 

Cipher

Senior Member
Messages
806
Here's a post with some prescription-free pharmacies that sell Methylcobalamin ampules. You can also search for it among more pharmacies using @Hip's neat search tool here.
 
Messages
69
https://www.nutrivitashop.com/vitamin-b12-99-8-pure-methylcobalamin-powder/
It's expensive enough. Yikes!!! It should be pure but of course at that price, I know you'll want to research it and make sure.

Edit: Sorry, just noticed it doesn't say "sterile." :(
Thank you, I've come across that before and spoken to them. They get that from China. The purity looks high on that, but it can't be used for IM injection.

This statement from that page is very interesting for me:
"Methylcobalamin that is ingested is not used directly as a cofactor, but is first converted by MMACHC into cob(II)alamin. Cob(II)alamin is then later converted into the other 2 forms, adenosylcobalamin and methylcobalamin for use as cofactors. That is, methylcobalamin is first dealkylated and then regenerated."

From that I infer that I have some kind of genetic issue with that dealkylizing and regenerating pathway, and that is why IM injection is so far superior to anything oral for me.

Thanks for trying to help!
 
Messages
69
Here's a post with some prescription-free pharmacies that sell Methylcobalamin ampules. You can also search for it among more pharmacies using @Hip's neat search tool here.
Thank you for that. I am specifically looking for sterile B12 powder for injection (by mixing with saline). As far as I can tell, it's not available anywhere in the world.

Powder stays 100% fresh until saline is added. Then it immediately starts degrading. As I mentioned above, within 7-10 days, even the highest quality powder stops working for me. My guess is that all MeB12 that is produced and sold in liquid form is relatively weak by comparison

My theory is that ultra-fresh MeB12 may have important medical implication that are not currently understood. I only say this because I experienced full health for 9 months - until they switched suppliers, and I cannot find anything that will do the same thing. There is hope that Greg's B12 oils will work. Hopefully they're on their way...
 

Wayne

Senior Member
Messages
4,268
Location
Ashland, Oregon
I experienced full health for 9 months - until they switched suppliers, and I cannot find anything that will do the same thing.

Hi @ironlion37 -- Is there a way to contact the supplier of the product that worked for you, and see if you can get it directly from them or through another outlet they service? Good luck figuring this all out. It feels sort of like a detective drama!
 

Hip

Senior Member
Messages
17,789
I am specifically looking for sterile B12 powder for injection

Some people use 0.22 micron sterile filters on their syringes to turn non-sterile substances into sterile ones. So in principle non-sterile B12 powder might be safe for injection with such a filter.
 

Cipher

Senior Member
Messages
806
Powder stays 100% fresh until saline is added. Then it immediately starts degrading.
From what I've read dissolved methylcobalamine is stable by itself, but extremely sensitive to light:

When formulating methylcobalamin, many are aware of its sensitivity to light but may not know just how
sensitive it is. In our lab we carried out an experiment to see just how sensitive a typical formulation
might be to typical interior lab lighting. The formulation we selected as our test sample was one
containing methylcobalamin 1000 mcg/mL in normal saline plus benzyl alcohol 2%. We assayed the
sample to check its potency and found it to be 985mcg/mL so it was 98.5% potent, thus meeting
requirements. We then exposed the solution in a clear glass vial for 5 minutes under our lab’s typical
florescent lighting
, then once again tested it for potency. The potency was now at 54.4%, a 44.1%
decline! Much of the active had converted to hydroxocobalamin (B12a). After another 5 minutes
exposure, now a total of 10 minutes, the potency was now down to 30.8% a 67.7% decline from the
initial potency. After a total of 15 minutes, the potency stood at 15.2%, a total decline of 83.3% from the
starting point! Clearly, methylcobalamin is VERY light sensitive and easily converts to
hydroxocobalamin.
More recently, we found we could use a red light bulb in an enclosed area of our lab and the potency
did not decline at all, even after 15 minutes exposure time. The bulb we used was a Philips LED 8 Watt
bulb which was purchased at our local Home Depot for a very nominal cost. We repeated our
aforementioned 5, 10 and 15 minute test with this bulb as the only light source and found it worked very
well, no breakdown occurred. Our analyst had plenty of light to carry out all our normal testing
procedures, could easily read glassware graduations, and best of all, didn’t upset the others!
https://www.compounderslab.com/application/files/8715/4119/3589/Methylcobalamin_and_Light_10-18.pdf

Methylcobalamin, one of the two active forms of vitamin B12, is the most effective analog in permeation and in transportation of neurons in subcellular organelles. Formulations of methylcobalamin are only commercially available in a few countries, which make them inaccessible for most patients. Extemporaneously prepared injections become the only option for those patients. The objective of this work is to study the physical and chemical (ultrahigh- performance liquid chromatography stability-indicating method) stabilities of methylcobalamin injections in the presence and absence of preservative during 181 days (considering the stability limit as 90% of initial concentration of methylcobalamin). The light exposure stability of injections in amber serum vials or clear syringes, solution in amber or clear glassware under typical pharmacy, clinical, and laboratory settings are also presented. Methylcobalamin injections, regardless of the concentrations and inactive ingredients, remained stable for at least 181 days at room temperature when stored in amber serum vials and protected from light. These experimental data suggested that the methylcobalamin injection solutions should be protected from light completely and light exposure in pharmacy, clinical, and laboratory setting should be minimized.
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31085783/

Perhaps not all manufacturers of methylcobalamine ampules take the correct precautions and shield the solution from light during production, but maybe if you try a lot of different suppliers hopefully you'll find one that is potent.
 
Messages
69
From what I've read dissolved methylcobalamine is stable by itself, but extremely sensitive to light:



https://www.compounderslab.com/application/files/8715/4119/3589/Methylcobalamin_and_Light_10-18.pdf


https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31085783/

Perhaps not all manufacturers of methylcobalamine ampules take the correct precautions and shield the solution from light during production, but maybe if you try a lot of different suppliers hopefully you'll find one that is potent.
Thank you Cipher. I've actually spoken with the compounding lab that is the source of your first citation. And despite the claim in the second source (which I'm going to dig into more deeply), my personal experience is that it does start degrading as soon as I add saline. The first shot is perfectly potent, the next a little less so, the third, a little less and so on. (with 48hrs between each injection)

Maybe you're right about continuing to try different suppliers of the ampules. I will keep doing that as I continue to search for powder.
 

Cipher

Senior Member
Messages
806
And despite the claim in the second source (which I'm going to dig into more deeply), my personal experience is that it does start degrading as soon as I add saline. The first shot is perfectly potent, the next a little less so, the third, a little less and so on. (with 48hrs between each injection)
That's a very interesting observation. Maybe it gets oxidized by the oxygen in the air, but when it's stored in airtight ampules the oxidation stops when the limited oxygen in the ampule has fully reacted? This is pure speculate, could be completely wrong.

Is this the same as Oxford Bioscience's methylcobalamine?
 
Messages
69
That's a very interesting observation. Maybe it gets oxidized by the oxygen in the air, but when it's stored in airtight ampules the oxidation stops when the limited oxygen in the ampule has fully reacted? This is pure speculate, could be completely wrong.

Is this the same as Oxford Bioscience's methylcobalamine?
That makes sense.

Yes, they get theirs from OB and mark it up 3x.
 
Messages
69
Update: I just discovered what could be a promising lead on who the original supplier was: a company in Spain. I just spoke with their U.S. rep and he is going to put me in touch with their pharmaceutical division in Spain once they come back from holiday (3 weeks...).

This particular product uses a production method that results in a purer, cleaner product which fits the description of what was working for me before. And if OB switched to a Chinese supplier, that could explain why their product now feels "dirty" in my system and why they are fiercely refusing to tell me anything about the supply situation.
 
Messages
69
Thanks, I have some on order! Hoping it will work but so far nothing has touched the injections I used to be able to get from Oxford Biosciences.
Just an update: this product arrived. It does has some effect but is not great for me. Overall I can't say I really like it as a product. No comparison to the original B12 sterile powder I used to get.

I'm finding it hard to believe that I know what makes me well and I can't purchase it anywhere in the world. The basic premise is that pure methylcoblamain (i.e., methylcobalamin powder) is too dangerous for the public to have access to so it is literally unavailable anywhere in the world without a pharmacist's license.

And because of that, I've now started the process of facing homelessness for the 9th time in 12 years. It begins with applying for emergency assistance for rent. My appointment is tomorrow.
 

datadragon

Senior Member
Messages
389
Location
East Coast, USA
This statement from that page is very interesting for me:
"Methylcobalamin that is ingested is not used directly as a cofactor, but is first converted by MMACHC into cob(II)alamin. Cob(II)alamin is then later converted into the other 2 forms, adenosylcobalamin and methylcobalamin for use as cofactors. That is, methylcobalamin is first dealkylated and then regenerated."

From that I infer that I have some kind of genetic issue with that dealkylizing and regenerating pathway, and that is why IM injection is so far superior to anything oral for me.

You are referring to this research https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2785186/ and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2709701/ It is possible that glutathione loss is the first culprit. Perhaps consider looking at trying S-Acetyl L-Glutathione with the oral forms. https://forums.phoenixrising.me/thr...elp-me-so-much-momentarily.89782/post-2438411 This may happen with ongoing inflammation or infection as zinc uptake is lowered and further becomes unavailable to utilize and is needed as a glutathione cofactor. Also B12 appears to react with superoxide when glutathione is depleted (which can happen after inflammation/infection and the lowering of zinc levels also) which would drain the B12. https://forums.phoenixrising.me/thr...elp-me-so-much-momentarily.89782/post-2438405

Also if its specific issue to B12 functions. The body can only use the B12 methylcobalamin and adenosylcobalamin directly, while all other forms of vitamin B12 must first be converted in the body. The conversion steps involved in this are dependent on the vitamins B2 (riboflavin) and B3 (niacin). The second bioactive form of vitamin B12, adenosylcobalamin, requires biotin (also known as vitamin B7 or vitamin H) and magnesium, in order to fulfill its important role in aiding the function of the mitochondria – the “power stations” of our cells.
 
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Messages
69
You are referring to this research https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2785186/ and https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2709701/ It is possible that glutathione loss is the first culprit. Perhaps consider looking at trying S-Acetyl L-Glutathione with the oral forms. https://forums.phoenixrising.me/thr...elp-me-so-much-momentarily.89782/post-2438411 This may happen with ongoing inflammation or infection as zinc uptake is lowered and further becomes unavailable to utilize and is needed as a glutathione cofactor. Also B12 appears to react with superoxide when glutathione is depleted (which can happen after inflammation/infection and the lowering of zinc levels also) which would drain the B12. https://forums.phoenixrising.me/thr...elp-me-so-much-momentarily.89782/post-2438405

Also if its specific issue to B12 functions. The body can only use the B12 methylcobalamin and adenosylcobalamin directly, while all other forms of vitamin B12 must first be converted in the body. The conversion steps involved in this are dependent on the vitamins B2 (riboflavin) and B3 (niacin). The second bioactive form of vitamin B12, adenosylcobalamin, requires biotin (also known as vitamin B7 or vitamin H) and magnesium, in order to fulfill its important role in aiding the function of the mitochondria – the “power stations” of our cells.
Very interesting, thank you. I'm finding this forum to be very helpful.

I need to get some more clarity about glutathione as I was reading in another thread on here last night to stay away from glutathione entirely.
 
Messages
45
Check a supplement called "glyteine" is the most potent but pretty expensive. I mean in the glutathione department

I'm near Spain. What provider did you use?

Ive also ordered the oils. Still waiting for them to arrive. My wife is currently doing 3 injections of hydroxocobalamin per day. It seems to be helping, although very little by little.

I'm most interested on what you can find