Staci Stevens Conceptual Model for Physical Therapist Management of CFS/ME

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Staci Stevens has been another of my heroes as she's the only person I've seen doing realistic work on "exercise" and ME/CFS - recognizing and even measuring post-exertional malaise, recognizing that aerobic exercise is harmful and warning against it........... Such a realistic breath of good science. The Video from the Calgary 08(?) conference was brilliant (I did post it here, but too tired to look for the link right now).

As Stevens is maybe the best known of the authors, I put her name on the title here. This is another instance where I can't get the full article. I'm curious as to what the article says - quite broad-reaching goals are set. Anyone? Please?

'Conceptual Model for Physical Therapist Management of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis'

Todd E. Davenport, Staci R. Stevens, Mark J. VanNess, Christopher R. Snell and Tamara Little

First published on February 25, 2010
Physical Therapy
DOI: 10.2522/ptj.20090047
http://ptjournal.apta.org/cgi/content/abstract/ptj.20090047v1

T.E. Davenport, PT, DPT, OCS, is Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, Thomas J. Long School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave, Stockton, CA 95211 (USA).

S.R. Stevens, MA, is Executive Director, Pacific Fatigue Laboratory, Department of Sport Sciences, University of the Pacific.

M.J. VanNess, PhD, is Associate Professor, Department of Sport Sciences, University of the Pacific.

C.R. Snell, PhD, is Professor and Chair, Department of Sport Sciences, University of the Pacific.

T. Little, PT, EdD, DMT, FAAOMPT, is Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, Thomas J. Long School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, University of the Pacific.

tdavenport@pacific.edu


Fatigue is one of the most common reasons why people consult health care providers. Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is one cause of clinically debilitating fatigue. The underdiagnosis of CFS/ME, along with the spectrum of symptoms that represent multiple reasons for entry into physical therapy settings, places physical therapists in a unique position to identify this health condition and direct its appropriate management. The diagnosis and clinical correlates of CFS/ME are becoming better understood, although the optimal clinical management of this condition remains controversial. The 4 aims of this perspective article are:

(1) to summarize the diagnosis of CFS/ME with the goal of promoting the optimal recognition of this condition by physical therapists;

(2) to discuss aerobic system and cognitive deficits that may lead to the clinical presentation of CFS/ME;

(3) to review the evidence for graded exercise with the goal of addressing limitations in body structures and functions, activity, and participation in people with CFS/ME; and

(4) to present a conceptual model for the clinical management of CFS/ME by physical therapists
 

dsdmom

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Hi - I was able to get this via a friend. I will post in Library. I haven't read it yet - looking forward to it and hoping it might have some good info for my PT.

ETA: The "lead" author's name (or first one listed) is Davenport, so it is under Davenport in the Library.
 
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Hi - I was able to get this via a friend. I will post in Library. I haven't read it yet - looking forward to it and hoping it might have some good info for my PT.

ETA: The "lead" author's name (or first one listed) is Davenport, so it is under Davenport in the Library.
thank you so much dsdmom! I'm looking forward to reading it.

if:)
 

Dolphin

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Nearly finished reading the paper. Although there is some good observations, there are a few bits I'm unhappy with. Maybe others have time to write more.
 

Dolphin

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Staci Stevens also has ME/CFS.
Don't know about others, but I knew that.
Do people know that her exercise intervention was tested in a study by Leonard Jason and others in 2007* and it didn't come out that well. Pacing came out a lot better.
As an aside, this paper doesn't menton that study.

*
Non-pharmacologic Interventions for CFS: A Randomized Trial

Journal Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings

Issue Volume 14, Number 4 / December, 2007
DOI 10.1007/s10880-007-9090-7
Pages 275-296

Non-pharmacologic Interventions for CFS: A Randomized Trial

Leonard A. Jason1 , Susan Torres-Harding2, Fred Friedberg3, Katrina Corradi1, Mary Gloria Njoku1, Julie Donalek1, Nadia Reynolds1, Molly Brown1, Bing Bing Weitner4, Alfred Rademaker4 and Morris Papernik5

(1) Center for Community Research, DePaul University, 990 W. Fullerton Ave., Chicago, IL 60614, USA
(2) Roosevelt University, Chicago, IL, USA
(3) Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA
(4) Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA
(5) Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA

Published online: 15 November 2007

Abstract Non-pharmacological behavioral treatments for CFS have been suggested as promising. These trials have tested protocols composed of behavioral, cognitive and cognitive–behavioral interventions but there have been few efforts to differentially evaluate their outcomes. The primary purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of nurse delivered non-pharmacologic interventions. In the present study, 114 participants diagnosed with CFS were randomly assigned to four 6-month interventions. The interventions were: cognitive–behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, anaerobic activity, and a relaxation control group. The study found that these interventions led to increases in several areas of functioning, with more consistent changes occurring among those participants in the cognitive condition. For the 25 variables in this study, significant change occurred for 28%, 20%, 16%, and 12% of the variables for the cognitive, cognitive behavior therapy, anaerobic activity, and relaxation conditions, respectively. However, the majority of participants continued to be diagnosed with CFS following the treatment trial. Implications of these findings are discussed.
 
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Thanks for sharing the info!!!

Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is one cause of clinically debilitating fatigue. The underdiagnosis of CFS/ME, along with the spectrum of symptoms that represent multiple reasons for entry into physical therapy settings.:Retro redface:

The cause of CFS is unknown, but the condition may be related to infection with effects on the immune system.:worried:

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