Sleeping on the belly with head to the side - is it bad for neck issues?

Bergkamp

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Hi all,

I like to sleep on my belly with my head either to the left or right side. It has never caused me any issues. Recently I’ve suffered a severe crash which I attribute to either accidentally taking dexamethasone or (very light and gentle) neck exercises I was doing for a week (just involved moving the head up and down and left and right on the pillow).

Since then I keep getting worse (it’s now 5 weeks ago) and I’m trying to pinpoint why. Assuming I have an undiagnosed neck issue, is sleeping on the belly with my head to the side a trigger - even if it feels totally normal and comfortable while doing it?
 
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I used to sleep in that position and no longer can at all. for me no longer being able to seems related to pregnancy and childbirth doing something to my spine especially the neck area making the position hurt to much. i have not been able to get anything diagnosed specifically to my spine but it sure hurts. i don't have any answers just my body has made it clear that position is no longer ok for me.
 

Bergkamp

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I used to sleep in that position and no longer can at all. for me no longer being able to seems related to pregnancy and childbirth doing something to my spine especially the neck area making the position hurt to much. i have not been able to get anything diagnosed specifically to my spine but it sure hurts. i don't have any answers just my body has made it clear that position is no longer ok for me.
Thank you for your reply.
 
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Sleeping on your back with your head turned to the side can certainly make neck issues worse by keeping your neck twisted to one side for prolonged periods. .

The common wisdom is that stomach sleeping can help with snoring and apnea, but my husband snores up a storm if he sleeps on his stomach. From everything I've read, side sleeping is best, especially for helping prevent snoring and possibly sleep apnea.
 

Bergkamp

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Sleeping on your back with your head turned to the side can certainly make neck issues worse by keeping your neck twisted to one side for prolonged periods. .

The common wisdom is that stomach sleeping can help with snoring and apnea, but my husband snores up a storm if he sleeps on his stomach. From everything I've read, side sleeping is best, especially for helping prevent snoring and possibly sleep apnea.
Thank you, that's helpful info
 

Judee

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Yeah, I don't think it is good for the neck. I'm mostly a side sleep but sometimes I twist a bit towards the mattress and even with that much I feel neck pain starting even though I have an ergonomic neck pillow.

However, if you are needing a way to transition from sleeping on your belly all the time you might try this position. (It's the first picture in my post here and taken from a book by a physical therapist.)

https://forums.phoenixrising.me/threads/hard-to-fall-asleep-on-back.76569/#post-2210076
 

Bergkamp

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Yeah, I don't think it is good for the neck. I'm mostly a side sleep but sometimes I twist a bit towards the mattress and even with that much I feel neck pain starting even though I have an ergonomic neck pillow.

However, if you are needing a way to transition from sleeping on your belly all the time you might try this position. (It's the first picture in my post here and taken from a book by a physical therapist.)

https://forums.phoenixrising.me/threads/hard-to-fall-asleep-on-back.76569/#post-2210076
Thank you, this is helpful. I'm actually kind of sleeping like that, but without the pillows. when I sleep on my belly I'm not fully flat, my legs are pulled inwards and to the side. I just got into the position I'm sleeping in, and it's actually not fully on the belly, more like on one side of the chest if that makes sense.
 
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I like to sleep on my belly with my head either to the left or right side.
similar here: only my head tolerates looking to the left. but not to the right. (my right side neck is full of weakness)

I think this entirely depends on individual necks and messages necks give.

If you sleep on your stomach you dont' really need a pillow

If one leg is slightly pulled up, it takes pressure off the lower back which is sensitive to that prone position.
 
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Assuming I have an undiagnosed neck issue, is sleeping on the belly with my head to the side a trigger -
I think my undiagnosed neck issues are triggered when I lie back, on my back. It all starts to feel more and more off, when I lie back fully.

There are these online physical therapists, Bob and Brad: they are funny but good..and they have videos about sleep positions, and what they may infer..(not about CCI, but just generally)....