Sinus Congestion When Talking

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I’m not typically very congested, but do frequently get irritation in the nasopharynx, which is usually the first sign that I’ve done something to trigger symptoms.

But I’ve noticed on several occasions that I become increasingly congested when I talk for more than a couple of minutes. This morning I was talking to my therapist and after about 20 min I had to start clearing my nose just to be able to keep talking… no discharge, just feels very blocked.

Was wondering if anyone else has experienced this pattern and what could help… I just ordered a face streamer because I think some of the issues stem from me getting dry, which is why talking is an issue. Just trying to figure out what the connection is between talking and the other symptoms.
 

tinacarroll27

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Yes, I get that! If I talk for too long a get very congested in the sinuses! If I talk for too long I have also crashed so I sometimes think the congestion is a warning I am overdoing it. When I first got ME I spent months having to whisper or I would crash, so I think talking for too long can set off PEM (in me at least).
 
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I just ordered a face streamer because I think some of the issues stem from me getting dry, which is why talking is an issue. Just trying to figure out what the connection is between talking and the other symptoms.
I have dry sinus but something is often inflamed and irritated and swollen...I usually can still breathe thru it but not always.

Things are also very very dry.

its all sore now, I'm run down today. Too much nothing, yesterday. Somehow I over did doing nothing.

It will get worse as the day progresses.

***
I have chinese herbs which moisten the lungs and often help wiht the dryness...I'm just sort of not taking them at the moment....
 
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Yes, I get that! If I talk for too long a get very congested in the sinuses! If I talk for too long I have also crashed so I sometimes think the congestion is a warning I am overdoing it. When I first got ME I spent months having to whisper or I would crash, so I think talking for too long can set off PEM (in me at least).
I also crash if I talk too much. I get this intense feeling of inflammation in my sinuses that nothing seems to help, and then by the next day I feel ill throughout my body
 

Booble

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I've been getting it down lower when I talk. This weird feeling between the layrnx and the esophagus like the trachea/windpipe is all tickly like I have to cough.

I'm doing some release of unconscious emotional issues (which I really didn't think I had much of) and it's doing magic.
My laryngitis/hoarseness getting better.
And hey, Ruf, I was thinking of you because suddenly for the first time, while I was visualizing beating the shit out of someone, my mouth filled with saliva. After weeks of dry, dry, dry.
LOL
Not sure how it's working but the more I just forget about the symptoms let them come if they will, the more they go away.
 
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I've been getting it down lower when I talk. This weird feeling between the layrnx and the esophagus like the trachea/windpipe is all tickly like I have to cough.

I'm doing some release of unconscious emotional issues (which I really didn't think I had much of) and it's doing magic.
My laryngitis/hoarseness getting better.
And hey, Ruf, I was thinking of you because suddenly for the first time, while I was visualizing beating the shit out of someone, my mouth filled with saliva. After weeks of dry, dry, dry.
LOL
Not sure how it's working but the more I just forget about the symptoms let them come if they will, the more they go away.
How are you going about doing this? Are you working with someone or doing a program on your own?
 

Booble

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How are you going about doing this? Are you working with someone or doing a program on your own?
I read a bunch of stuff on the works of Dr. John Sarno and his concept of TMS.
Here's an introduction to from an old 20/20 episode.

The idea is that our bodies distract us from feeling/recognizing past painful feelings by giving us symptoms. It's a protection mechanism to save us from the emotional pain. Often the symptoms jump around to really get your attention.

I'm not following any program per se.
Here's what I'm doing:
- I'm not paying attention to my symptoms and not letting them stop me from doing.
(For example, I had been resting my voice because of the hoarse laryngitis, afraid to speak and make it worse. Once I started this a week ago, I realized, just talk. So what if it's hoarse or hurts.)

- When my mind goes to my symptoms, I re-focus it on emotional feelings.

- I'm writing daily getting in touch with past pains, anger, guilt, madness, fears.

It has been interesting because I know I have a lot of fears but I really thought I didn't have any anger. Sarno says you might have hidden anger for feeling like you have to be perfect or successful. But on my second day of writing, I thought I'd try writing specifically what I might be angry about. I wrote, "I'm angry about _______. I forget what I wrote but I wrote 3 things and my heart start pounding really hard. Really hard. I had to close my notebook after just a few minutes.. And it was so bad I said out loud, "give me my symptoms back! They are better than this!"

Isn't that weird? I realized, holy heck, I must have some anger in there!
So the next day, instead of going so directly, I wrote about how that was so weird and asked myself what must be going on in there. I sometimes let "little Booble" or "teen Booble" write.
I know this is weird, like Sybil or something but it just sort of free flows like that for me.

The type of personality with this "syndrome" is very similar to the CFS/ME profile.
Formerly Type A's, wanting to be good, successful, perfectionists...

I wasn't going to bring it up here because I know as CFS/ME people we are sick of doctors acting like or saying outright "it's all in your head."
But honestly it's been pretty fricking tremendous.
My adrenal system has calmed down SO much. And my throat thing getting much better.
(I'm afraid to actually write that.)

I joined a forum on this and using the same Booble name as my user name if you end up seeing me there. That's me. :)
 
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I read a bunch of stuff on the works of Dr. John Sarno and his concept of TMS.
Here's an introduction to from an old 20/20 episode.

The idea is that our bodies distract us from feeling/recognizing past painful feelings by giving us symptoms. It's a protection mechanism to save us from the emotional pain. Often the symptoms jump around to really get your attention.

I'm not following any program per se.
Here's what I'm doing:
- I'm not paying attention to my symptoms and not letting them stop me from doing.
(For example, I had been resting my voice because of the hoarse laryngitis, afraid to speak and make it worse. Once I started this a week ago, I realized, just talk. So what if it's hoarse or hurts.)

- When my mind goes to my symptoms, I re-focus it on emotional feelings.

- I'm writing daily getting in touch with past pains, anger, guilt, madness, fears.

It has been interesting because I know I have a lot of fears but I really thought I didn't have any anger. Sarno says you might have hidden anger for feeling like you have to be perfect or successful. But on my second day of writing, I thought I'd try writing specifically what I might be angry about. I wrote, "I'm angry about _______. I forget what I wrote but I wrote 3 things and my heart start pounding really hard. Really hard. I had to close my notebook after just a few minutes.. And it was so bad I said out loud, "give me my symptoms back! They are better than this!"

Isn't that weird? I realized, holy heck, I must have some anger in there!
So the next day, instead of going so directly, I wrote about how that was so weird and asked myself what must be going on in there. I sometimes let "little Booble" or "teen Booble" write.
I know this is weird, like Sybil or something but it just sort of free flows like that for me.

The type of personality with this "syndrome" is very similar to the CFS/ME profile.
Formerly Type A's, wanting to be good, successful, perfectionists...

I wasn't going to bring it up here because I know as CFS/ME people we are sick of doctors acting like or saying outright "it's all in your head."
But honestly it's been pretty fricking tremendous.
My adrenal system has calmed down SO much. And my throat thing getting much better.
(I'm afraid to actually write that.)

I joined a forum on this and using the same Booble name as my user name if you end up seeing me there. That's me. :)
Thanks a lot for explaining all of that! I’ll be honest, I tried some stuff from the Gupta program and I didn’t feel like it was for me… I just wasn’t sensing a connection between my thoughts and my symptoms and I actually felt less at peace when I was trying to monitor for negative thoughts. That said, I’m still open to giving anything a try really, and I’m not in a position to be picky. So maybe Dr. Sarno’s approach will be a better way in for me. Either way, I’ll definitely look into it - thanks!
 

Booble

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Hi Felis,
You might be interested in this article. Be sure to read through the anecdotal story midway down.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/...ng-the-unexplainable-chronic-fatigue-syndrome

The author of this article is Dr. Howard Schubiner, one of the leading medical doctor's with expertise in this area. He treats CFS/ME patients through this methodology.
Dr. Sarno is no longer alive so there are a few experts (and a lot of pseudo experts) who have continued in this area. Dr. Schubiner is supposed to be one of the best.
 
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Hi Felis,
You might be interested in this article. Be sure to read through the anecdotal story midway down.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/...ng-the-unexplainable-chronic-fatigue-syndrome

The author of this article is Dr. Howard Schubiner, one of the leading medical doctor's with expertise in this area. He treats CFS/ME patients through this methodology.
Dr. Sarno is no longer alive so there are a few experts (and a lot of pseudo experts) who have continued in this area. Dr. Schubiner is supposed to be one of the best.
Thank you! I put Dr. Sarno’s book on hold via my library app.

That anecdote sounds very similar to Ashok Gupta’s own story. I can definitely get my head around the potential for the brain to create symptoms, but the mention of being encouraged to push through symptoms gives me pause. Of course the other school of thought is that doing this can make your condition much more severe, and my experience of the symptoms is so punishing and long-lasting that I don’t think I could physically sustain it. But I will read on and see if there are any manageable levels of things I can try. I do appreciate your help.
 

Booble

Senior Member
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Yes, it's a tough thought. Though of course that's what our brain wants us to believe.
I think it helps to change our perception. It's not "pushing through symptoms" it's "ignoring" symptoms. Doing and not thinking about how we feel.
Clearly those who have gotten to the point of CFS/ME (in this theory) have a very, very strong inner consciousness -- causing all kinds of havoc. It has a tight grip. But we can loosen the grip.

I think there's nothing to lose. I mean don't go out and run a marathon or pull multiple all nighters or anything. But doing life is worth trying.

I'm only 11 days in and have had massive improvement.
 
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Yes, it's a tough thought. Though of course that's what our brain wants us to believe.
I think it helps to change our perception. It's not "pushing through symptoms" it's "ignoring" symptoms. Doing and not thinking about how we feel.
Clearly those who have gotten to the point of CFS/ME (in this theory) have a very, very strong inner consciousness -- causing all kinds of havoc. It has a tight grip. But we can loosen the grip.

I think there's nothing to lose. I mean don't go out and run a marathon or pull multiple all nighters or anything. But doing life is worth trying.

I'm only 11 days in and have had massive improvement.
Glad to hear about your improvement. I’m curious what kinds of things you started with? Did they cause symptoms like they normally would? What was it like for you to ignore them when they are so debilitating to begin with?

I do think the journaling, or at least finding some kind of emotional outlet could be a good place to start for me. There’s a lot of trauma, sadness, and more of an existential fear that I haven’t been able to fully express while in the midst of all this… even with my therapist it hasn’t been easy to get it all across and of course I have issues when talking like I mentioned before. So maybe the journal would be a good way to face those things more head on.