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Since the Covid-19 is around, what are some of the best things you have to stabilize your immune system and health?

amaru7

Senior Member
Messages
252
Hi, I have Vitamin D, Zinc, Selenium, NAC, Magnesium, a health juice, Biotin, B1, ascorbic acid. Is there anything further you would recommend?

I feel I'm starting to sicken, the weather is cold and I'm working as a delivery man getting in and out of my car between warm and cold, I think that puts pressure on my health, I need anny strenghtening support I can get.

So any tips would be welcome.

Here's also a video from Dr. Berg an alternative doctor I appreciate.

Only thing is that he recommends against ascorbic acid, says only natural sources, which others say differently, I'm still on the fence on that subject.

Colodial Silver I haven't tried, he also recommends it in that video.
 

pamojja

Senior Member
Messages
2,398
Location
Austria
..says only natural sources, which others say differently, I'm still on the fence on that subject.

One small study on the use of synthetic ascorbic acid for prevention:

Synergistic Effect of Quercetin and Vitamin C Against COVID-19: Is a Possible Guard for Front Liners

This study aimed to evaluate if quercetin and vitamin C could be protective against Novel Coronavirus.

Methods: In prophylaxis group supplementation containing 500mg of quercetin, 500mg of vitamin C and 50mg of bromelain (QCB) was initiated daily in 2 divided doses for 71 healthcare workers working in areas with high risk of COVID-19, whereas 42 were determined as control group without using supplements.A maximum period of follow-up was determined as 120 days.Termination of use of QCB earlier or having a Coronavirus infection was considered as final point.At the end rapid diagnostic test used to detect immunoglobulin positivity.

Results: A total of 113 persons included. No significant difference detected between groups in terms of other features.Mean age of QCB group was 39.0 ± 8.8 years and control group was 32.9 ± 8.7.Average follow-up period for the QCB group was 113 days, and for the control group, 118, during follow-up period, 1 healthcare worker in QCB group and 9 out of 42 in control group had COVID-19.One of cases was asymptomatic, while others were not.Transmission risk hazard ratio whose did not receive QCB was 12.04 (95% Confidence interval= 1.26-115.06, P = 0.031).No significant effect of gender, smoking, antihypertensive medication exposure and having chronic disease on rate of transmission.

Conclusion: This study revealed that QCB was protective for healthcare workers.

Therefore a total of 113 study participants:

71 in the study group receiving 500 mg AA + quercetine/bromelain. 1 tested covid-positive = 1,4%
42 in the control group receiving nothing. 9 tested positive = 21%


Personally I supplement comprehensively, and have for example taken 24 g of synthetic ascorbic acid every day during the last 12 years. Thereby experiencing remission from a 60% walking disabilty from PAD, COPD 1 and ME/CFS symptoms (PEMs).

Collodial silver I havn't experience with, seems good against infections I don't get anyway. Vitamin C in itself can be very powerful, especially if taken with the first sign of symptoms in high enough doses repeatedly, ie: titrating to bowel tolerance: http://doctoryourself.com/titration.html
 

keepswimming

Senior Member
Messages
327
Location
UK
Along with a good multivitamin (includes vit D, selenium, vit C, zinc etc) I've been taking allicin/garlic extract, and drinking echinacea and ginger tea every day. Allicin is meant to be good for helping fight off colds and flu, echinacea for the immune system, and ginger is an antiviral.

A couple of weeks ago I could feel I was coming down with something, probably a cold. I upped the amount of echinacea/ginger tea I was drinking, and kept on with my vitamins. I also gargled/nasal irrigated with salt water. Whatever I was fighting off never developed into anything, my immune system obviously did its job. So I'm hoping all I'm doing made a difference and it helps if I contract covid-19!
 
Last edited:

vision blue

Senior Member
Messages
1,877
From the abstract of an article on covid:
"Finally, strategies following from the theory are briefly covered including melatonin for men to decrease their usually higher NADPH levels and for older men, N-acetyl cysteine to restore glutathione levels to more youthful values. "
 

Zebra

Senior Member
Messages
867
Location
Northern California
Hi, @amaru7

I have a secondary immunodeficiency, and the following herbs have improved my lymphocyte count. Maybe they could help you, too?

*Astragalus Extract
(I use NOW brand, 500 mg in AM)

*Reishi, maitake, or cordyceps mushrooms
(I use a mushroom blend: Host Defense brand called Stamets 7. It's pricey, but worth it for cold/flu season. I take 2 capsules in the PM)

*As mentioned above, Echinecea also works really well, but should be avoided if you have an autoimmune issues.

*I also take high-dose vitamin C twice in AM & PM

Hope this helps! Best wishes for good health!
 

Rufous McKinney

Senior Member
Messages
13,392
Swear by the chinese don't get sick pills: Yin Chiao....always have them, take for 36 hours at the earliest stage of colds or flus, or if your headed to an exposure event. Plum flower is a good brand, tested.
 
Messages
4
I saw this study showing 50% of their asymptomatic patients had persistence of the Covid virus in the small bowel after 3 months. I also read Mhill suggesting to take ascorbic acid to bowel tolerance when an infection starts to kill it in the gut.

My girlfriend has been suffering from long Covid so would it be worth going through the procedure to ensure the virus isn't hanging about in the bowel?
 

Hopeful2021

Senior Member
Messages
262
Hi, I have Vitamin D, Zinc, Selenium, NAC, Magnesium, a health juice, Biotin, B1, ascorbic acid. Is there anything further you would recommend?

I feel I'm starting to sicken, the weather is cold and I'm working as a delivery man getting in and out of my car between warm and cold, I think that puts pressure on my health, I need anny strenghtening support I can get.

So any tips would be welcome.

Here's also a video from Dr. Berg an alternative doctor I appreciate.

Only thing is that he recommends against ascorbic acid, says only natural sources, which others say differently, I'm still on the fence on that subject.

Colodial Silver I haven't tried, he also recommends it in that video.

@amaru7

NAD IV
IV glutathione
Zinc, pqq, NAD, magnesium and staying keto adapted

Also only nasal breathing and keeping aware of nitric oxide to help keep lungs and nasal passageways strong
 

amaru7

Senior Member
Messages
252
One small study on the use of synthetic ascorbic acid for prevention:



Therefore a total of 113 study participants:

71 in the study group receiving 500 mg AA + quercetine/bromelain. 1 tested covid-positive = 1,4%
42 in the control group receiving nothing. 9 tested positive = 21%


Personally I supplement comprehensively, and have for example taken 24 g of synthetic ascorbic acid every day during the last 12 years. Thereby experiencing remission from a 60% walking disabilty from PAD, COPD 1 and ME/CFS symptoms (PEMs).

Collodial silver I havn't experience with, seems good against infections I don't get anyway. Vitamin C in itself can be very powerful, especially if taken with the first sign of symptoms in high enough doses repeatedly, ie: titrating to bowel tolerance: http://doctoryourself.com/titration.html
That is an amazing improvement you had with vitamin C! Which one do you take, just regular aa?

And is it possible to premix, say 1 bottle of water with ascorbic acid powder and take a spoon every hour or so?

Or maybe tablets or pills would be easier?

I want to find a convenient way to take it. I experienced improvements with small doses already at the beginning of a cold or when I'm unwell with lung pain it goes away with just a gram or two of AA.

I want to try taking it more regularly. I think Dr Berg might be wrong on this one even though most of his videos are well researched.

It might be that ascorbic acid is just one aspect of natural vitamin C, but still studies and people like you report great healing success with it.
 

pamojja

Senior Member
Messages
2,398
Location
Austria
Personally take regular pure ascorbic acid powder, anything else is multiples more expensiive and as such daily doses would expose to too much binder and fillers. Not that healthy at such doses at all. Therefore would only take 2-3 pills /caps a day, and the remaining as powder in water. Most usually before each meal and bedtime on empty stomach.

Not everyone tolerates the acidity of such high doses. Which is easy to remedy by mixing up to half AAs weight of sodium bicarbonate into a glass of water to render it pH-neutral.

Everyone tolerates different amounts before a temporary stool-flush shows it was too much. Therefore increase doses gradually. Personally tolerate about 50 g/d taken throughout the day. With an additional cold my ascorbate-need increases that much, I'm simply unable to get enough to reach bowel-tolerance within a day. Very very few will not even tolerate 3 g/d.

AA has a short half live in water. Therefore the actual AA one gets premixed in water after hours is already very little compared to what was added. Its much more effective to simply add a teaspoon full into water each time one takes it. To max my intake, at times I even take half-a-teaspon AA directly on my toungh, and flush it down with a sip of water.

Linus Pauling Institude searched the science and found AA is just as well absorbed with or without cofactors. However, I do also take plenty of bioflavoinoids, also quercetine and bromelain in that study, additionally on their own.