Scientists pioneer new method of measuring electricity in cells

antares4141

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Interesting, so how is this different than the nanoneedle Ron Davis is using to measure voltage?
The method Davis uses with the "nanoneedle"
Snip: the development, employs a “nanoelectronic assay,” which is a test that measures changes in miniscule amounts of energy as a proxy for the health of immune cells and blood plasma. The diagnostic technology contains thousands of electrodes that create an electrical current, as well as chambers to hold simplified blood samples composed of immune cells and plasma. Inside the chambers, the immune cells and plasma interfere with the current, changing its flow from one end to another. The change in electrical activity is directly correlated with the health of the sample.

The idea is to stress the samples from both healthy and ill patients using salt, and then compare how each sample affects the flow of the electrical current. Changes in the current indicate changes in the cell: the bigger the change in current, the bigger the change on a cellular level. A big change is not a good thing; it’s a sign that the cells and plasma are flailing under stress and incapable of processing it properly. All of the blood samples from ME/CFS patients created a clear spike in the test, whereas those from healthy controls returned data that was on a relatively even keel. :snip

The method used in the article above:
snip:
The researchers' new tool, called Voltair, makes it possible to explore this question further. It works as a voltmeter measuring the voltage difference of two different areas inside a cell. Voltair is constructed out of DNA, which means it can go directly into the cell and access deeper structures. :sinp
 

antares4141

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Interesting, so how is this different than the nanoneedle Ron Davis is using to measure voltage?
Ron Davis has the idea that he can run a current through a stressed sample of immune cells and blood plasma. And measure the impedance.

The article above is not stressing the cells but measuring a voltage difference between two different areas of a single cell.

I am skeptical that the Davis method of "measuring impedance" could give you any useful information.

While the other one sounds difficult to impossible to do. "measuring voltage differences" is probably pretty easy. Doing it on a cellular level seems to me to be a pipe dream.

Honestly I am not holding my breath for either one.

Davis is thinking we can try drugs on the samples and see if he can find a drug that inhibits the impedance.

Which right out of the box I don't like cause it's the old "let's chase the symptoms" approach instead of finding out what is causing them in the first place and than from there trying to figure out a way to block whatever process it is that leads to them. (like insulin for diabetics) Drug testing is an option but I would think you would try that when you understand what is causing the process first. You wouldn't want to use drugs on a diabetic. Unless you consider insulin a drug. I think it is a hormone.

Like for instance aids. We know it's a virus. We can't supersede the process by killing the virus. So with no other viable options until they develop a vacine. You impede the virus with antivirals.

And there are lots of other disease processes that might account for CFS like lyme bacteria or viruses. If that is the case the test's probably are not going to show any type of anomaly that could be used to identify CFS patients. And while that is not a total waste of time because now you know you have to look more closely for pathogens, immune disorders, genetic anomalies, metabolic disorders, chemical and other types of injuries like we see in covid long haulers, etc, etc, etc. But personally I think this is where we should have started.