Sarsaparilla

Carrigon

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Has anyone tried Indian Sarsaparilla, herb. I've been looking into trying it. It has alot of good properties that might help. It has cortin effects for those of us low in cortisol. It has hormonal effects that might help, especially for those of us who noticed a hormonal connection. And it was used to fight spirochetes for a long time. It does have diuretic properties, which might not be good for those of us with POTS, but I'm looking into it. I'd only be interested in trying the Indian variety, that's the one that was used against spirochetes and would be good for those of us with Lyme.
 

Lotus97

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Hmm, so I guess someone should be cautious with sarsaparilla (aka smilax) since it can raise cortisol. Even if someone does have low cortisol that needs to be raised slowly or it can be counter-effective. I first heard about sarsaparilla for Lyme disease because it's supposed to bind to endotoxins and be a blood cleanser. It can also increase testosterone and progesterone making it useful for men and women. Sarsaparilla can also lower blood sugar. I'm somewhat skeptical when it comes to claims about herbs in general. I think some are true and some are not. This from herbs2000
http://www.herbs2000.com/herbs/herbs_sarsaparilla.htm
Sarsaparilla can act as an anti-inflammatory and cleansing agent. The herb cab be invaluable in bringing quick relief for a wide array of disorders and problems, such as for instance, skin problems such as psoriasis, eczema and itchiness, and can help treat gout, rheumatism, and rheumatoid arthritis. Certain experts advocate the herb is a very good medicine with potential use for treating impotence. This is because sarsaparilla has a specifically testosterogenic action on the body. This can lead to a dramatic increase in one's muscle bulk. The fact that sarsaparilla has a progesterogenic action means that the herb can be used to bring relief to women suffering from symptoms of menopause and other menstrual problems, like the premenstrual syndrome. In certain cases where menopause is associated with debility and depression sarsaparilla can be very useful. As a matter of fact, Native Amazonian people have been known to take sarsaparilla to improve their virility and to treat problems associated with menopause.
 

Ema

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Anyone have any ideas about sarsaparilla officianalis?

It sounds like the Indian version is not a true sarsaparilla...

http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-suppl...dientid=379&activeingredientname=sarsaparilla

Don’t confuse sarsaparilla with Indian or false sarsaparilla (Hemidesmus indicus, Family: Apocyanaceae). There are reports that this false sarsaparilla is a common impurity found in sarsaparilla preparations. False sarsaparilla contains none of the possibly active chemicals found in true sarsaparilla (Smilax febrifuga, Family: Smilacaceae).
Very confusing...
 

Sushi

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Anyone have any ideas about sarsaparilla officianalis?
This seems to be Smilax.
It sounds like the Indian version is not a true sarsaparilla...
Is sarsaparilla officianalis the Indian version? My doctor prescribed Smilax. I had a cortisol test while on it (though I was also taking Rifampin which can lower cortisol) and my cortisol was extremely low.

Sushi
 

heapsreal

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Smilax was common yrs ago by bodybuilders as it was suppose to increase testosterone . Not sure of mechanisms but i think it stimulated the hypothalmus etc not to different to tribulus.

i didn't know it helped cortisol, that could be interesting?
 

Ema

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Here's the best I've found on the differences between the two.

It seems that for spirochete activity, we actually want the regular Sarsaparilla, not the Indian one.

Sarsaparilla (Smilax spp.)

Sarsaparilla grows throughout the world, with the tropical varieties found in the Caribbean, South America, Mexico, and Central America being most prized for their medicinal value. Sarsaparilla is particularly useful for illness caused by spirochetes, such as syphilis,16,17 leptospirosis and Lyme disease. In fact, it was included in the United States Pharmacopoeia as a treatment for secondary syphilis.18

Sarsaparilla contains plant steroids like sarsasapogenin, smilagenin, sitosterol, stigmasterol, and pollinastanol, and saponins including sarsasaponin, smilasaponin, sarsaparilloside, and sitosterol glucoside.19,20 The majority of sarsaparilla’s pharmacological properties and actions have been attributed to these steroids and saponins.

In China, the herb has been used in combination with other botanicals for syphilis and leptospirosis.21 Zampieron et al have experienced excellent clinical success using sarsaparilla for patients with Lyme disease.22 A protocol developed by Zampieron and Kamhi combines Jamaican or Honduras sarsaparilla (4:1 solid extract), tetracyclic oxidonle alkaloid (TOA), free cat’s claw (Uncaria tomentosa), standardized olive leaf extract, Qinghao, and a combination of Chinese botanicals (including Lonicera Japonica, Glycyrrhiza uralenisi, Dictamnus dasycarpi, Portulacae oleraceae, Taraxacum mongoli, and Dipsacus japonica). These herbs are used as part of a comprehensive holistic protocol to address the ravages of Lyme disease.23

Saponins (found in sarsaparilla) emulsify and bind to endotoxins in the gastrointestinal tract, aiding in their elimination.24 Many illnesses, including RA,25 psoriasis,26 gout, and acne have been associated with increased levels of endotoxins.27,28 The anti-inflammatory mechanism of action of sarsaparilla for arthritis is linked to its ability to inhibit TNF-alpha-induced NFkB activation.29,30
Indian Sarsaparilla Vine (Hemidesmus indicus)
Indian sarsaparilla vine is not a true sarsaparilla, but is actually a close family member of American Milkweed and European Pleurisy Root. It is traditionally used for snakebites, chronic skin diseases, and autoimmune illnesses such as RA.31,32 The active chemical constituents of this plant include coumarins and triterpenoid saponins, which act as oxygen radical scavengers33 and immune modulators34 while protecting kidney33 and liver function.35

Hemidesmus down-regulates the activity of pro-inflammatory agents (interferons, interleukins, prostaglandins) and other immune cells (T and B cells, antibodies, cytokines) involved in the inflammatory process, and acts as a powerful tissue protective anti-oxidant.33,36