Porphyromonas gingivalis in Alzheimer’s disease brains

pattismith

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Porphyromonas gingivalis in Alzheimer’s disease brains: Evidence for disease causation and treatment with small-molecule inhibitors

  1. Stephen S. Dominy1,*,,
  2. Casey Lynch1,*,
  3. ...
Science Advances 23 Jan 2019

Abstract
Porphyromonas gingivalis, the keystone pathogen in chronic periodontitis, was identified in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease patients. Toxic proteases from the bacterium called gingipains were also identified in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients, and levels correlated with tau and ubiquitin pathology. Oral P. gingivalis infection in mice resulted in brain colonization and increased production of Aβ1–42, a component of amyloid plaques. Further, gingipains were neurotoxic in vivo and in vitro, exerting detrimental effects on tau, a protein needed for normal neuronal function. To block this neurotoxicity, we designed and synthesized small-molecule inhibitors targeting gingipains. Gingipain inhibition reduced the bacterial load of an established P. gingivalis brain infection, blocked Aβ1–42 production, reduced neuroinflammation, and rescued neurons in the hippocampus. These data suggest that gingipain inhibitors could be valuable for treating P. gingivalis brain colonization and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease.
 

Moof

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How interesting...but I wonder whether this still applies in people who had their teeth removed half a century or more before developing Alzheimer's?

(In the years following the creation of the NHS, it was fairly common practice in the UK for people who had a lot of cavities to have all their teeth removed, even as young adults – for instance, my Mum was 22 when she got her dentures, and I think my Dad was about 27. At least some of the older people now suffering from Alzheimer's will have had the same procedure.)

I suppose the pathogen could still hang around in the mouth, though, even where there's no gingivitis or periodontitis present.
 

lauluce

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This is so revealing... my grandma had severe periodontitis all her life, and ended developing alzheimers. But the most important thing is, my mother, who has both his parents and one grandmother with alzheimers, also suffers from periodontitis and tooth loss... I wonder if the best course of action for her would be to remove her remaining teeth? I should research this further!
 
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