Pathogens Hijack Host Cell Metabolism: Intracellular Infection as a Driver of the Warburg Effect in Cancer and Other Chronic Inflammatory Conditions

Violeta

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Has anyone looked at this paper yet? I don't see ME/CFS mentioned in the abstract but Amy does mention that it does apply to ME/CFS in the link on her Twitter account.

https://ij.hapres.com/htmls/IJ_1341_Detail.html
Amy D. Proal 1, Michael B. VanElzakker


Last, we examine further trends associated with infection and host cell metabolism, including how pathogen-driven hijacking of host cell lipid metabolism can support viral, bacterial, and parasite survival and replication.
 

msf

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Thanks a lot for posting this, it makes a whole lot of sense given my own experience and that of many other people with ME. The feedforward effect seems of particular note in terms of how ME persists over decades. The diet section also is of great help in explaining why many people do better on low carb diets.
 

Violeta

Senior Member
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Thanks a lot for posting this, it makes a whole lot of sense given my own experience and that of many other people with ME. The feedforward effect seems of particular note in terms of how ME persists over decades. The diet section also is of great help in explaining why many people do better on low carb diets.
It's such a long report! Intracellular pathogens....what to do about them.

Some people do have good results with a low carb diet. I have tried it many times but feel just terrible, lose too much weight, can't sleep, and get lightning bolt cramps in my legs in the middle of the night.

I am wondering if thiamine corrects Warburg type metabolism. Dr Lonsdale has one article about thiamine and the Warburg effect, but it doesn't specifically say that thiamine corrects it.