Pacing: Very interesting HealthRising article re HR and HRV monitoring and pacing - I may finally spring for an HR/HRV monitor!

sometexan84

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@sometexan84 - any thoughts on this device?
Well, you often get what you pay for. It's a bit more expensive than the polar strap, and w/ the warranty, it seems legit, so why not.

It says it still covers some of the advanced metrics you want, like the LF/HF ratio. And I think the fact that it's an Elite HRV product could be a good thing as well.
 

Judee

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Here's an older article of using the HR monitor to track. I like how it gives specifics on how that Workwell patient managed to exercise 3x per week laying down and thereby improve her AT threshold and PEM recovery time.
https://solvecfs.org/using-a-heart-rate-monitor-to-prevent-post-exertional-malaise-in-me-cfs/

Detecting exercise
Does it alarm if you go over your set AT, do you know?

I remember one guy on YT using a Timex HR watch to pace because it did alarm when he went over. I kept meaning to buy one but never got around to it.

I wonder which one Hannah in the article @Mary posted used because Hannah seemed to indicate that it would go off and then instead of instantly resting for 2 minutes she would try to finish up what she was doing.
 

hapl808

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I'd definitely like something that tracks HR all day in addition to HRV - and pulse ox during sleep, etc.

After looking a bit, the best seem to be Fitbit Sense, Garmin VivoSmart 4, Garmin VivoActive 4, Apple Watch 6, Fitbit Charge 4, Fitbit Inspire 2, or some previous models of these.

Too many choices. Leaning toward the VivoSmart 4, although some of the skin temperature sensors sound interesting in other options (my skin temperature does seem to change a lot during crashes I think).
 

Sushi

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Does it alarm if you go over your set AT, do you know?
You can set HR zones with an alarm but not AT.
and pulse ox during sleep, etc.
From the reading I have done the technology for measuring oxygen saturation on fitness trackers is not accurate yet. For measuring it accurately during sleep, at this point I think you will need a sophisticated pulse ox rather than a fitness tracker. Some of the trackers claim to measure ox saturation but their data has not proved to be reliable.
 
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I use whoop and have had it for 8 months, so I tend to trust it for my sleep stats and HRV. It is an ongoing cost, however, so I think it is out of reach for many, even if you sign up longer geem to get a cheaper per month price.

I am happy with my Garmin VivoActive 4s. Have used it only 3 months. I originally picked it for continuous, all-day spo2 readings and step tracking. Its sleep stats are not as precise as whoop's but it does have that Body Battery measurement, which I feel helps to quantify my strain easier than whoop's 0-20 "strain" score (based on Perceived Level of Exertion).

Because I am taking a beta blocker, whoop is less likely to register a strain because its algorithm seems to be influenced by your max heart rate for that time period. This is fine for non-ME/CFS people. Because I am pacing and taking beta blockers, it rarely registers anymore strain. If I were to eventually not need beta blocker, then I would be more trusting of the strain scores.

When my whoop membership runs out, I will be sad to take off the strap because: it is so comfortable to wear (cloth/nylon and old style snap closure wristband), is so easy to charge (you never have to take it off and so, never lose datapoints), waterproof, collects data multiple times per minute ( I forget how many...250?), great sleep stats, can broadcast HR via BLE and whoop API allows for fetching the data through 3rd party util habitdash.com).

But, in the end, economy wins out and I feel the Garmin VivoActive that I have does the trick. I don't like the plasticky strap and have not been successful in replacing the strap style to one similar to whoop's. The graduations in the strap never quite match my small wrist and tends to make me itchy sometimes.
 
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I also agree that Polar chest strap is most accurate for pacing. I also agree that it is very tough to use for long pwriods as it does trigger rashes for me.

If you cannot tolerate a chest strap, suggest you use a fitness tracker that is able to HR broadcast to a smartphone app that you use for HR alerting. I use Android, and am currently limited to Pulsometer RR ehich appears to be the only one so far with configurable HR alarms. Pulsometer RR only works with BLE and ANT+. Depending on the fitness tracker you use, it may or may not communicate with Pulsometer RR. You will just have to test it or hope someone else has. The pacing FB group was an excellent resource for me and allowed me to be realistic about how I can use fitness trackers with pacing.
 

gbells

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I'm using welltory. It's free and just uses the phone's flash and video. I need to remember to do the morning baseline. So far my fatigue scores are really bad, 14%, which correlates with my energy spoons. It definitely is interesting. Thanks for the idea to monitor HRV.
 

Abrin

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@Mary

I am using the Garmin Vivosmart 4 and I've got to say I am beyond unimpressed with its HRV algorithm.

I use a Corsense with the EliteHRV app and the hardware is very accurate.
 

sb4

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Inspired by this post I recently purchased a "Samsung Gear Fit2 Smart " just to track my heart rate convientiently. I chose this one because you can turn bluetooth off and just use the watches screen. Its pretty decent so far. Cost £30-40.

Used it yesterday throughout the day. Seems like most of the day my hr is 100bpm fluctuating by 20 or so either way.
 

Jyoti

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I'm using welltory.
I tried this app for a couple of months and found that the readings were meaningless--almost every single one showed extremely high HRV, the interpretations were confusing (you have enough energy to go for it today! when I was bed bound, or the reverse). I know the thing is free and the technology rudimentary, but I thought I would get a sense of how HRV reflects how I feel, what I could learn from it.

I deleted the app last week because I was learning nothing. That said...I would be really interested in what you notice, @gbells, after using it for a bit.
 

gbells

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I tried this app for a couple of months and found that the readings were meaningless--almost every single one showed extremely high HRV, the interpretations were confusing (you have enough energy to go for it today! when I was bed bound, or the reverse). I know the thing is free and the technology rudimentary, but I thought I would get a sense of how HRV reflects how I feel, what I could learn from it.

I deleted the app last week because I was learning nothing. That said...I would be really interested in what you notice, @gbells, after using it for a bit.
Ok. I'll repost back after I've got the baseline set. So for this morning's reading shows a good stress recovery from 14% yesterday evening after I did a lot of light work (2 hours) back up to 34% at waking.
 

Mary

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I'm using welltory. It's free and just uses the phone's flash and video. I need to remember to do the morning baseline. So far my fatigue scores are really bad, 14%, which correlates with my energy spoons. It definitely is interesting. Thanks for the idea to monitor HRV.
fwiw, the elitehrv mobile app is also free and may be more accurate.
 

Mary

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@Abrin (or anyone!) I have a general question - I don't have a clue how to use an HRV monitor. I'm probably going to get the Corsense one: CorSense Heart Rate Variability Finger Sensor by Elite HRV and use their free app. From what I've read, it's probably the most accurate device, and also very easy to use - no chest strap, it looks like a pulse oximeter. It fits on your finger.

So - how long does it take to get a reading with these things? Do you just have to wear it for a minute or so? How does it determine anything having to do with sleep? You don't wear it all night do you? Or do you just compare night time readings with morning?

I feel a bit silly asking these questions but I really don't have a clue and would appreciate any info - thanks!
 

Abrin

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So - how long does it take to get a reading with these things? Do you just have to wear it for a minute or so? How does it determine anything having to do with sleep? You don't wear it all night do you? Or do you just compare night time readings with morning?
With the Corsense I only take a morning reading. That only takes three minutes.

Everything I originally learned about HRV, I actually learned from this article on Health Rising. After that it was all a lot of trial and error and listening to the Elite HRV podcast.

https://www.healthrising.org/forums...sting-could-help-you-improve-your-health.353/