• Phoenix Rising needs funds to operate: please consider donating to support PR

Ok science geeks — what does this tell you about my physiology??

Messages
38
Likes
31
About a year and a half ago, I went on a strict keto diet and I felt AMAZING for two weeks. I went from bedridden to going to church, my kids activities, cleaning my house...all within a matter of days of starting it.

But then it all faded and I was back to baseline...even though I was sticking with the diet.

Ive had this experience in the past...anything that makes my body feel better (and it’s few and far between), will make me feel great for a day or two and then stop working. But keto lasted the longest.

Any idea why this is? (I should note that I have yet to address any viruses that may be at the root of my illness)
 

Bansaw

Senior Member
Messages
440
Likes
284
The body habituates. Acetyl-L-Carinitine worked well for me, then stopped.
I was on Keto for 7 mnths, just come off it. With Keto you have to really supplement wisely, otherwise your body will suffer from lack of, for example, magnesium, potassium etc. It may have been that gradually on Keto you were missing some important vitamins/minerals.
 
Messages
38
Likes
31
The body habituates. Acetyl-L-Carinitine worked well for me, then stopped.
I was on Keto for 7 mnths, just come off it. With Keto you have to really supplement wisely, otherwise your body will suffer from lack of, for example, magnesium, potassium etc. It may have been that gradually on Keto you were missing some important vitamins/minerals.
Hmmm, interesting. Yeah I was supplementing wisely b/c I was under the guidance of a super smart nutritionist / Ben Lynch trained / Bredesen trained doc. We did start a yeast killing protocol and that’s when it started to go downhill, but even after we stopped that I couldn’t get back the gains I had when I started keto.

So how do we heal if the body keeps habituating?
 

helen1

Senior Member
Messages
997
Likes
1,414
Location
Canada
It may not be habituation, it may be that you’re adding stress to your adrenals with ketosis. There is debate about this but from my readings so far, I think if you have weak adrenals, keto will make it worse. It’s also the experience of many on an Adrenal group I belong to.
 

Hip

Senior Member
Messages
13,370
Likes
25,246
But then it all faded and I was back to baseline...even though I was sticking with the diet.

Ive had this experience in the past...anything that makes my body feel better (and it’s few and far between), will make me feel great for a day or two and then stop working. But keto lasted the longest.
I've joked that ME/CFS is an intelligent disease: it knows when you are trying to tackle it, and so each time you make gains, the disease just intelligently adapts to maintain the upper hand!

I've had a few instances when I thought I was almost cured for few weeks after starting a new medication, only to find the positive effects of the med vanished after a short while, even though I continued to take the med.


However, there are also times when a supplement or medication which helps continues to do so long term. So don't give up looking for solutions.
 
Messages
88
Likes
115
Location
Kiev, Ukraine
I had similar experiences of something working for on first day and then stopping completely after a few days. For me, the solution was to apply the treatment more directly on to the problem, but the way to do that is very specific to each problem. One immunostimulanting/immunomodulating drug was effective in that it improved my response to a treatment that I linked above, but it's very hard to know what exactly it did that helped.
 

valentinelynx

Senior Member
Messages
1,072
Likes
2,821
Location
Tucson
Yes, ME/CFS appears to have it's own homeostasis. There are countless stories of people feeling better with any number of treatment approaches only to relapse after more or less time. For me, I had a virtual 100% recovery for one week after a ketamine infusion by Jay Goldstein, MD around 1996. Then the symptoms came back gradually. I also had a remission about a year later to about 80% function that lasted for about 12 years. I was trying many things before the remission. I wasn't able to reproduce their benefit after the relapse. The temporary nature of recovery has led some to believe that ME/CFS is a protective state. This is the idea behind the Dauer concept.
 
Messages
3,402
Likes
8,549
The temporary nature of recovery has led some to believe that ME/CFS is a protective state. This is the idea behind the Dauer concept.
I found this very detailed review article on Placebo effects...to be...interesting..and likely involved in our experiencing of a treatment helping, or not helping, or helping for a while then not.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6013051/

Summary of key points:...
Key points

  • Placebo effects are effects of the context surrounding medical treatment. They can have meaningfully large impacts on clinical, physiological and brain outcomes.
  • Effects of placebo treatments are consistent across studies from different laboratories. These effects include reduced activity in brain areas associated with pain and negative emotion, and increased activity in the lateral and medial prefrontal cortex, ventral striatum and brainstem.
  • Placebo effects in pain, Parkinson disease, depression and emotion are enabled by engagement of common prefrontal–subcortical motivational systems, but the similarity across domains in the way these systems are engaged has not been directly tested.
  • Meaningfully large placebo effects are likely to require a mixture of both conceptual belief in the placebo and prior experiences of treatment benefit, which engage brain learning processes.
  • In some cases, placebo effects are self-reinforcing, suggesting that they change symptoms in a way that precludes extinction. The mechanisms that drive these effects remain to be uncovered, but doing so could have profound translational implications.
 
Messages
3,402
Likes
8,549

renski

Senior Member
Messages
307
Likes
104
Hmmm, interesting. Yeah I was supplementing wisely b/c I was under the guidance of a super smart nutritionist / Ben Lynch trained / Bredesen trained doc. We did start a yeast killing protocol and that’s when it started to go downhill, but even after we stopped that I couldn’t get back the gains I had when I started keto.

So how do we heal if the body keeps habituating?
Dunno why doctors continue to think killing yeast is the answer :/

www.youtube.com / watch?v=fjbdGc1p6LM
https://www.ei-resource.org/article...gal-infections-why-most-treatments-dont-work/
 
Last edited: