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News in Context: Cancer Drug to Reverse Parkinson’s Symptoms 10/20/15 via Michael J. Fox foundation

*GG*

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Concord, NH

ahmo

Senior Member
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Northcoast NSW, Australia
The drug, nilotinib, works to stimulate the cellular clearance system or “garbage disposal.” In leukemia, it helps clear out cancer cells. In Parkinson’s nilotinib may help dispose of the toxic protein clumps that lead to dopamine cell death.

http://suzycohen.com/articles/reducepain/

Reduce Inflammation Naturally with Nature’s Pac Man

Proteolytic enzymes another type of enzyme. They chew up proteins and help with digestion. I think they’re great for chronic pain syndromes. They help dissolve fibrin deposits which helps bruising. As a teenager (way back in the 1980’s) we played a game called Pac Man. Remember? (Please tell me you remember). This popular arcade game included a Pac-Man which traveled a maze and gobbled up ghosts. I was a monster at Pac-Man in my hey day! Proteolytic enzymes work in the same way, they just gobble up debris, as opposed to ghosts.

With less debris, there is improved circulation all over your body. Less debris also translates to more oxygen and healing nutrients delivered to the site of injury. As a pharmacist, I recommend you reach for proteolytic enzymes before you NSAIDs such as acetaminophen, naproxen or ibuprofen. Why? Because they are temporary and they have side effects. It’s the equivalent of applying a bandage, and while most of you fair out well, the unlucky few experience diarrhea, nausea, headaches, dizziness, bleeding ulcers or heaven forbid, kidney damage. Besides, if you mask your pain with medicine, but continue to operate as normal, you increase your risk of permanent damage.

A German scientific paper studied proteolytic enzymes in 100 athletes. The results were kind of shocking. More than 75 percent said the enzyme treatment produced favorable results. Even better no side effects were reported! So incredible were the results that the German government sent millions of enzyme capsules to the Olympics to help their athletes heal quicker.

http://doctormurray.com/healing-power-of-proteolytic-enzymes/

Proteolytic enzymes are indicated in inflammatory conditions and to support the immune system. Proteolytic enzymes (or proteases) refer to the various enzymes that digest (break down into smaller units) protein. These enzymes include the pancreatic proteases chymotrypsin and trypsin, bromelain (pineapple enzyme), papain (papaya enzyme), fungal proteases, and Serratia peptidase (the “silk worm” enzyme). Preparations of proteolytic enzymes have been shown to be useful in the following situations:

  • Cancer
  • Digestion support
  • Fibrocystic breast disease
  • Food allergies
  • Hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis)
  • Hepatitis C
  • Herpes zoster (shingles)
  • Inflammation, sports injuries and trauma
  • Pancreatic insufficiency
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis and other
  • Sinusitis, asthma, bronchitis, and autoimmune disorders chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
How do the proteolytic enzymes help autoimmune conditions like rheumatoid arthritis?

The benefits in some inflammatory conditions appears to be related to helping the body breakdown immune complexes formed between antibodies produced by the immune system and the compounds they bind to (antigens). Conditions associated with high levels of immune complexes in the blood are often referred to as “autoimmune diseases” and include such diseases as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, scleroderma, and multiple sclerosis. Higher levels of circulating immune complexes are also seen in ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, and AIDS. 4-6