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New European guidelines on hyponatraemia - at last

MeSci

ME/CFS since 1995; activity level 6?
Messages
8,231
Location
Cornwall, UK
Hyponatraemia (low blood sodium) is a potentially life-threatening condition that may be more common in ME/CFS patients than in the general population, due to many of us apparently tending to lose a lot of sodium in urine. This is certainly true of myself, as I have mentioned in several threads, and I have been seriously ill with it twice. Doctors clearly had little idea of what tests to run, for example to ascertain my fluid levels, and instead resorted to disbelief and accusation when I tried to enlighten them. I did not receive the correct treatment, and ended up with additional problems by the time I was discharged, as I have also mentioned elsewhere. So this news is extremely welcome, and may save lives.

From Physician's First Watch:

New Guidelines from Europe on Hyponatremia
By Joe Elia

A clinical practice guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of hyponatremia appears in the European Journal of Endocrinology. It's the result of a collaboration among three European societies.

The writers "were keen to ensure that the document focused on patient-important outcomes and included utility for clinicians involved in everyday practice." To that end, evidence and the recommendations are graded, and practical advice is provided (for example, contemporaneous collection of blood and urine specimens to guide correct interpretation of lab results), as are algorithms for diagnosis and management.

The guidelines were developed by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, the European Society of Endocrinology and the European Renal Association -- European Dialysis and Transplant Association.

Link(s):
European Journal of Endocrinology article (Free PDF) http://click.jwatch.org/cts/click?q=227;67966367;AhCYf5xdz2DZJXh5b4ZFvxnhTgKzWBG6UiLeklccMAE=
 

taniaaust1

Senior Member
Messages
13,054
Location
Sth Australia
Hyponatraemia (low blood sodium) is a potentially life-threatening condition that may be more common in ME/CFS patients than in the general population, due to many of us apparently tending to lose a lot of sodium in urine. This is certainly true of myself, as I have mentioned in several threads, and I have been seriously ill with it twice. Doctors clearly had little idea of what tests to run, for example to ascertain my fluid levels, and instead resorted to disbelief and accusation when I tried to enlighten them. I did not receive the correct treatment, and ended up with additional problems by the time I was discharged, as I have also mentioned elsewhere. So this news is extremely welcome, and may save lives.

From Physician's First Watch:

My computer wont download it (I usually can download those files, must be a big one) but thanks for that anyway. I would of liked to have read it (hopefully I'll have another computer in within the next couple of months).