Nerve conductivity tests? Neurology?

urbantravels

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Curious about something, I didn't find any discussion in the forums about nerve conductivity tests. Wondering if anyone has had them, or heard of them being tried to see if anything is awry in ME/CFS patients?

This is stemming from discussion with the family scientist, who started thinking out loud about CFS as a neurological disease, and muttered something about the "ion channel." Wondered if I'd had a nerve conductivity test, or been seen by a neurologist. No on both - they've run me through rheumatology, endocrinology, I.D. and cardiology, but never neurology.
 

Stone

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Yes, I've had nerve conduction studies on my arms and hands for carpal tunnel syndrome as well as on my legs from the hip/groin to my feet for neuropathic pain in my legs. They don't take long, but can be momentarily pretty painful. They use a small needle which is wired to a machine and stick it in a certain muscle (not deep) corresponding to a particular nerve and send a bit of current through it at various strengths or velocities, and then judging by the response time or clarity of the signal they determine if there is nerve damage and how severe it is. These tests are best done by an experienced neurologist, as much of it is interpretive. Don't be shocked if the tests come back completely normal, no matter what your symptoms might be.
 

Wayne

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Curious about something, I didn't find any discussion in the forums about nerve conductivity tests. Wondering if anyone has had them, or heard of them being tried to see if anything is awry in ME/CFS patients?

This is stemming from discussion with the family scientist, who started thinking out loud about CFS as a neurological disease, and muttered something about the "ion channel." Wondered if I'd had a nerve conductivity test, or been seen by a neurologist. No on both - they've run me through rheumatology, endocrinology, I.D. and cardiology, but never neurology.
Hi Urbantravels,

I had a nerve conductivity test done about 20 years ago, and still experience residual pain from this ordeal. It was very painful for me, and I believe caused some nerve damage. I couldn't recommend it, unless I had a clearly articulated description of why it should be a compelling priority.

I'm not a big believer in doing tests just for the sake of doing them. A prominent physician at Standford Medical School recently stated that a person could go into an emergency room these days with a severed finger, and nobody would believe them unless they first did a number of MRIs and x-rays to determine if the patient should be believed. Sound familiar?

Wayne
 

urbantravels

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Thanks for the link to the page about neurological channelopathies, JT1024. I'm not looking to have a nerve conductivity test for the fun of it, just wondering if they've been found or hypothesized to be of any use.

My main area of pain is the back of my neck at the C7, and no I'm not looking to get zapped there unless someone REALLY convinces me it's of use!
 

Otis

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Have you had an MRI of your c-spine? I have cervical stenosis (c5-6) which causes neck pain and numbness in my hands. A nerve conduction test didn't show any relation to my upper body pain. I have LOTS of pain in the major muscles of my back.

Best wishes,
Otis
 

urbantravels

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I have not had an MRI...as of yet. But you're not the first to ask whether I have.

I've assumed that I have neuropathic pain as part of CFS, since I never had neck/back pain before in my life apart from normal episodes of soreness from too much computer time, bad chairs etc. My first few months of CFS symptoms, I had general myalgias but nothing concentrated in joints or back - it took some months for joint pain to crop up. Now the most intractable pain I have is the neck pain. It seems others here have referred to neck pain as part of their syndrome.
 

Stone

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Neck pain is one of the most common things. I get massage therapy for mine from a very good myotherapist. Worth it. Not pleasant but effective. Nothing else works for me.