Moving to small town

Juanita Vee

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Hi, I am moving in with my parents. We found a place in a small town outside the city. I am going to miss being able to use Meals on Wheels, Skip the Dishes, easy access to my doctor and blood work. But I will be getting help from my parents, and with us under the same roof, it will make other things easier.

Just wondering if anyone has any suggestions on how to make small town living easier? E.g., what kind of supplies would be handy to stock up on? How to minimize trips to the city? How to make efficient trips to the city to see friends AND run errands (or advice not to do that and pace, pace, pace!)

thanks in advance!!
 

Wolfcub

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I don't know how, or if, this works at all where you are @Juanita Vee (as it does in the UK), but I have found booking grocery orders online on a store's webpage and having the order delivered to be incredibly helpful.
Some of my deliveries come a number of miles. As long as they will serve your post code (or zip code)

I am registered with 5 online grocery stores which gives me an option if one store doesn't have slots.
Here, we also have a "click-and-collect" option too, which means you order online, choose a time slot, then pick up the groceries in the car. They are so efficient, and no close social contact. The guys put the bagged groceries in the back of the car. There's no need to get out, except to open and shut the back.

Those things really save me tons of energy, and the shopping is done in 20 minutes online -can be done from bed! Much better than walking round a store with a trolley.

I order almost everything I use online and get it delivered as often as I can. But the delivery charges for groceries are not too steep here.
 

Wolfcub

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Sorry...I thought of other things too and meant to put them in the other post.

Supplies to stock up with: well basically anything you all eat that will fit in the freezer! Otherwise, cans, bottled goods and dry goods etc. But my advice is only buy things you already regularly eat.

Many fresh vegetables and most meats/fish etc can be frozen too and should be good for 6 months at -18C.

I have cans from stocking up for our first lockdown which I still haven't eaten (but in my case it was because my silly gut did a U-turn in March, so a strange case of irony occurred!) I bought lots of emergency canned food, which I could have normally managed to eat, but didn't as a usual thing. Got it "to be on the safe side". Mind you, cans do keep for a long time.

I would also make sure you stock up on any essential non-food items you regularly use whenever you do a big shop. Plus any OTC medicines that might be used, or vitamins/supplements etc.
 

Mary

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@Wolfcub - I can see how on-line ordering would be so efficient and useful with non-perishable items like canned goods and paper goods etc. But how has your experience been with items like fresh fruit and vegetables? Or perishable things like cream (considered a staple by many for their coffee!) or meat or fish?
 

wabi-sabi

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I've been doing all of my grocery shopping online-sometimes I pick up and sometimes I get delivery depending on how I feel. Since I can get groceries regularly I don't feel the need to stock up on anything. Whatever I need is always just a click away. All that's required is planning what I'll need for the week and then ordering it.

This, of course, might be different for you depending on how small a town you are going to. Have you checked on online grocery shopping where your parents live?
 

Wolfcub

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@Wolfcub - I can see how on-line ordering would be so efficient and useful with non-perishable items like canned goods and paper goods etc. But how has your experience been with items like fresh fruit and vegetables? Or perishable things like cream (considered a staple by many for their coffee!) or meat or fish?
They will deliver all these things. They are all on the grocery websites. And I have almost always found the freshness and quality to be perfect (except for one experience a few weeks ago with green potatoes!)

HOWEVER.... (caveat) some of the items on the website may or may not be available at the time your order is picked and packed! So it's important to put any possible substitutes you prefer on the list which usually comes up for those options. If you forget to do that, they will simply not deliver those unavailable items. But they don't obviously charge you for them. The money is taken on day of delivery.

Also, I presume due to coronavirus, the availabilty of delivery slots is patchy, so it's wise not to wait until you desperately need one, but plan ahead and try to bag a slot. On one grocery site I use, that can be a couple of weeks right now.

Here. it's our major supermarkets who do them, not some fly-by-night operation.
 
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wabi-sabi

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The quality of the produce I get is generally good as well. The only issue is that sometimes the apples are a bit soft, but then I just fry them instead of eating them whole. I try to order a combo of things I want to cook and some freezer meals if I am too sick and just need to be able to reheat something.
 

Juanita Vee

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I have been ordering groceries online for a while now, but the deliverers don't come to the small town we're moving to. But there is a small grocery store, and my mom drives, and a larger town is 10 minutes away and I can order online and just get pickup, so hopefully that will work out well for me and my parents. :)

I have been eating fresh cucumber a lot... I sure hope that doesn't have to change! I really like it! I don't think you can freeze cucumber... haha! If you can, I will be surprised!

I'm hoping there are some people in the small town who would be interested in picking things up or delivering things for me for a small fee. I really don't want to have to rely on my parents too much... but I guess it will be what it will be, que sera, sera!
 

lenora

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JuanitaVee.....Hello! How far is the small town from where you live at the moment?

I think you've received some very good advice and you can always borrow a cup of sugar from your neighbors ! Besides, you're quite good with a computer so you should be well set. It's a pity that the town isn't in the same area as the online store you've been using, but you may find the 10 min. away store very good for your needs. Also, good that there is a small grocery store in town.

Odd that Meals on Wheels doesn't delivery to your small town. One would think that's where the need is also great. My mother wouldn't touch the food that came, but I have to say that she received excellent home health care (save and except for the 3 nurses who stole her meds) We later had a similar situation with a sister of mine, but she reported them and one was fired, an RN who had been caught before. What a waste of time and talent...her license was revoked. Tip to all: Guard those medications, you can't get refills.

I hope you'll find a lot of things cheaper, rental, having the lawn cut, things of that nature. Also hope you have a great landlord. Good luck in your newest venture. Yours, Lenora.
 

Strawberry

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Or perishable things like cream (considered a staple by many for their coffee!)
I recently stumbled upon media cream. https://www.target.com/p/nestle-med...VmTytBh0V_Q1sEAQYASABEgKAT_D_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds It’s quite creamy in coffee and doesn’t taste like powdered. My only issue with it is it doesn’t quite dissolve 100% but it’s great when you can’t get fresh cream. I’ve stocked up on a few cans for when the stores don’t deliver my cream.

@Juanita Vee My advice would be to talk to your neighbors. Ask about things like power outages, and how long they last. Small towns are often lower priority to the power companies.

If you are on a well, stock up on gallon jugs of water and store them in a plastic tub so if they break you don’t lose that water. Get a water purifier (even the pitcher style will work) to remove the plastic smell.

Also, firewood if you have a wood burning stove. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heated my living room, cooked on the top, and heated water for coffee and washing up on a wood (or gas) stove. Propane bbq is a lifesaver also for cooking outside with no electricity.

If you are on a septic, stock up on Scott’s or what ever septic approved tp you can find in your area. I nearly ran out of tp this spring with covid, they had no Scott’s and would sub store brand that isn’t septic safe. So I’m storing it anyway as if the power goes out long enough my tank can’t pump so I will have to use a bucket and bury it outside. :wide-eyed:

Candles and cards or puzzles are good pastimes.