Methylfolate from broccoli lowered homocysteine - Metafolin failed

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Has anyone heard of Methylfolate made from broccoli or something else that isn't a salt? I was speaking with someone who indicated that their homocysteine only decreased when they switched from Solar Metafolin to another brand of Methylfolate, but I couldn't get all of the details.
 

Victronix

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I tried a powered multi made by company that had "folate from broccoli" in it, but unfortunately it also had folic acid, and they don't offer any type that didn't include folic acid. If you take both folic and mfolate together you can run into problems. I would love to find a folate supplement that is only from food and doesn't add in mfolate or folic acid, but haven't found it so far. It's very difficult to search for also . . .
 

pamojja

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LifeExtension years ago used folate found in citrus fruits in their Multies. But now they exclusively use methylfolate.
 

pogoman

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Has anyone heard of Methylfolate made from broccoli or something else that isn't a salt? I was speaking with someone who indicated that their homocysteine only decreased when they switched from Solar Metafolin to another brand of Methylfolate, but I couldn't get all of the details.
Could it be the Quatrefolic that some brands use?
Made from corn but it is a glucosimine salt.
I've taken the Doctors Best brand before, advertised as more bioavailable than regular methylfolate.
 

pamojja

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I'm trying out the Garden of Life Women's Once daily Multi - a rare example of one that has only folate from food and doesn't include any folic acid or mfolate.
There is a very critical opinion about Garden of Life's whole food multi on an other forum:
Well, at least it's iron-free and not overdosed on any component. However, I generally object to so-called "whole food" multivitamins. Why? Because I generally object to nonsensical marketing humbug. Obviously, whole foods are not multivitamins and multivitamins are not whole foods. To suggest otherwise is not only dishonest but bordering on outright scam, particularly if the marketing and the discription on the bottle seeks to imply that the vitamins and minerals contained in such multis were sourced from plants. This is - with very few exceptions - not the case, as it would be economically unfeasable to the extreme and would necessarily render the product many times more expensive than it actually is. In reality, such brands generally use the same synthesized chemical compounds found in other brands but instead of putting them straight into the pills, they grow yeast on them, or they blend them with vetegables so that they end up dispersed in some cellular matrix. That doesn't make them any more "natural" though. To the contrary, you often find the cheapest and actually less natural form of vitamins in those products (such as synthetic vitamin E or folic acid), conveniently "hidden" behind the whole food label and targeted at customers who are basically critical about the supplements they take but really lacking the specific knowledge to judge their quality, thus relying on trivial attributes such as "natural".
And:
I can tell you with 100% certainty that there is definitely no way 603(!) mg of pulverized fruits and vegetables could possibly provide all those vitamins and minerals. If "the way this one is marketed and described makes it seem like all the vitamin/minerals came from the Organic Food Blend listed on the bottle" it is simply because it is even more fraudulently marketed than that other products.
And sadly, I must agree. When I started with my health-journey 10 years ago I calculated all vitamins and minerals I get from food by weighting each bite. Found a lot of inadequate intakes, which I tried to remedy by those foods, which according to food-databases contain the most of the lacking nutrients. For that aim I had to add whole tablespoons of powdered foods to my diet. There is really no way on earth it could contain that much in 634 mg of dried foods.

Just search for one food powder with the highest vitamin C content, and you'll see for yourself that you find none which would provide 60 mg already in 634 mg of dried powder, already leaving no space for any of the other food powders mentioned.
 

Victronix

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Thanks, that's really interesting about the power weight, density. My husband is an engineer - I'll ask what he thinks. It makes sense.

EDIT: His response to your statement - "There is really no way on earth it could contain that much in 634 mg of dried foods"

"You can if it's a dried liquid extract." He emphasizes the extraction process of compounds from whole plant material.


There's an interesting video on how the vitamins are made (I almost went with this company but then didn't b/c of the folic acid) - https://www.innateresponse.com/aboutus.asp (of course, the people in the video are sort of a concern - I doubt they are scientists . . .)

I basically cannot tolerate either folic acid or methylfolate added to vitamins, so I carefully examine all the ingredients - a lot of the so-called food-based vitamins add folic acid for folate or cyanocobalamin for B-12 (a huge indicator that they don't know what they are doing) and this one only adds methylcobalamin, which I can manage, so I'm mainly only taking it to try to get more folate. It's an experiment. Otherwise I take Dr Fuhrman's multivitamin, but it has very limited ingredients and no folate, since it leaves out folic acid.

But at the moment my system is becoming too chaotic because of my thyroid so I'll have to back off anyway and then try it again when things improve. I went through a thyroid nightmare back around 2009 that took 2 years to recover from enough to be able to work part time.
 
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