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Melatonins antioxidant abilities

heapsreal

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Antioxidant Defense—Combat Free Radical Damage While You Sleep
Since its discovery over 50 years ago, melatonin has demonstrated itself as a functionally diverse molecule, with its antioxidant properties being amongst its most well-studied attributes.26,27 Since then, a vast amount of experimental research has revealed its vital role in the body's defense against numerous cell-damaging free radicals—and for good reason.27-30 Melatonin has been found to possess 200% more antioxidant power than vitamin E.31 Melatonin has been found to be superior to glutathione as well as vitamins C and E in reducing oxidative damage.6
As such a potent antioxidant, melatonin plays a powerful role in fighting free-radical-related diseases—from cardiovascular disease to cancer and practically everything in between.
In post-menopausal women, for example, melatonin has been found to inhibit lipid peroxidation (damage to your fat cells caused by free radicals), thus leading to decreased levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol,31 one of the primary ingredients for the formation of atherosclerosis. A newer study on men confirmed these findings, suggesting that melatonin leads to overall lower levels of oxidative stress in humans.32 In individuals undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, melatonin exhibited a higher reduction in lipid peroxidation and improvements in red blood cell membrane stiffness.33
Other widely feared free radical diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD),34 acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS),35 glaucoma,36 and sepsis37 have also been responsive to increased melatonin levels.
http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2012/sep2012_7-Ways-Melatonin-Attacks-Aging-Factors_01.htm
 

anne_likes_red

Senior Member
Messages
1,103
I guess that's partly why decent sleep feels so anti-oxidative.
Body cooling :cool: at night is indicative of good levels of melatonin...I'm not sure how it works exactly the other way round ie cooling = better melatonin (but it does).
 
Messages
64
I think you need to take very high dosages of melatonin to benefit from its antioxidant qualities though. The usual 3mg will not cut it.
 

Art Vandelay

Senior Member
Messages
470
Location
Australia
I remember seeing an Italian study (my doc referred me to it) that used 20mg for (mainly fibro?) patients. I can't seem to find it again now. My doc had me on 20mg each evening when I took a 2 month break from the Marshall Protocol.
 

alex3619

Senior Member
Messages
13,810
Location
Logan, Queensland, Australia
When I was studying biochem from 2000-2002 melatonin was considered to be part of our brain flush. While we sleep, it cleans the brain of free radicals. Its always been known to be a powerful antioxidant, well at least since about 2000. Its one of the reasons people are supposed to wake up feeling like their brain is fresh and new, and was put forward as one of the reasons we need sleep.
 

anne_likes_red

Senior Member
Messages
1,103
When I was studying biochem from 2000-2002 melatonin was considered to be part of our brain flush. While we sleep, it cleans the brain of free radicals. Its always been known to be a powerful antioxidant, well at least since about 2000. Its one of the reasons people are supposed to wake up feeling like their brain is fresh and new, and was put forward as one of the reasons we need sleep.

To me restorative sleep feels like it cools and recharges the brain as much as the body.
I had sleep problems from age 11, and it's only the past nearly 2 years I've woken feeling anything like refreshed. Even if sleep is shortened or broken it still feels enough. Previously, broken nights crushed me - perhaps due to being permanently oxidised.
If I need to go to a school meeting on a Winter night and sit under horrible lights til 9pm (I don't wear my blue blockers out in public) even 8 hours solid sleep afterwards doesn't compensate. I think melatonin is magic stuff!
..Just my experience of course! Maybe because sleep issues preceded ME onset in my case any kind of intervention improving sleep feels extra significant?