"ME/CFS Symposium 2021: Lecture by Michael VanElzakker, PhD. English version"

ljimbo423

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Thanks for posting this.

It's good to see Michael VanElzakker also talking about how gut dysbiosis can be picked up by the vagus nerve, send signals to the brain, trigger the sickness response in the brain and cause microglia in the brain to become sensitized.

So smaller amounts of stimuli trigger the sickness response. He starts talking about this at 23:25 in the video. He talks about the sickness response causing pain, fatigue, anxiety, etc.
 

SWAlexander

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Thanks for posting this.

It's good to see Michael VanElzakker also talking about how gut dysbiosis can be picked up by the vagus nerve, send signals to the brain, trigger the sickness response in the brain and cause microglia in the brain to become sensitized.

So smaller amounts of stimuli trigger the sickness response. He starts talking about this at 23:25 in the video. He talks about the sickness response causing pain, fatigue, anxiety, etc.
The function and connection of the vagus nerve to the brain and the glial activation is exactly what many doctors do not know. When dr.´s say "it is all in your head" they are right, because the vagus nerve is sending the signals there.
 

ljimbo423

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The function and connection of the vagus nerve to the brain and the glial activation is exactly what many doctors do not know. When dr.´s say "it is all in your head" they are right, because the vagus nerve is sending the signals there.
I agree that it's the brain causing symptoms, and in that sense, it is all in my head.

It's refreshing to see Michael VanElzakker, who I think is fairly new to ME/CFS research, making these very important, even crucial connections in the pathology of ME/CFS.

There are doctors and researchers that have been researching ME/CFS for decades, and have not made these connections. He might be the one to make a big breakthrough.
 
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SWAlexander

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I agree that it's the brain causing symptoms, and in that sense, it is all in my head.

It's refreshing to see Michael VanElzakker, who I think is fairly new to ME/CFS research, making these very important, even crucial connections in the pathology of ME/CFS.

There are doctors that have been researching ME/CFS for decades and have not made these connections. He might be the one to make a big breakthrough.
Once a neurosurgeon told me gut bacteria has no way to the brain. I ask him, how the signal from the adrenal gland goes to the pituitary and hypothalamus? He just looked at me and walked out.