Magnesium sulfate and fetal membrane inflammation (LPS induced)

pattismith

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Magnesium sulfate differentially modulates fetal membrane inflammation in a time‐dependent manner

First published: 30 April 2018

Chorioamnionitis and infection‐associated inflammation are major causes of preterm birth.
Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is widely used in obstetrics as a tocolytic; however, its mechanism of action is unclear.
This study sought to investigate how MgSO4 modulates infection‐associated inflammation in fetal membranes (FMs), and whether the response was time dependent.

Method of Study
Human FM explants were treated with or without bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS); with or without MgSO4 added either: 1 hour before LPS; at the same time as LPS; 1 hour post‐LPS; or 2 hours post‐LPS. Explants were also treated with or without viral dsRNA and LPS, alone or in combination; and MgSO4 added 1 hour post‐LPS After 24 hours, supernatants were measured for cytokines/chemokines; and tissue lysates measured for caspase‐1 activity.

Results
Lipopolysaccharide‐induced FM inflammation by upregulating the secretion of a number of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines.
Magnesium sulfate administered 1‐hour post‐LPS inhibited FM secretion of IL‐1β, IL‐6, G‐CSF, RANTES, and TNFα.
Magnesium sulfate administered 2 hours post‐LPS augmented FM secretion of these factors as well as IL‐8, IFNγ, VEGF, GROα and IP‐10.
Magnesium sulfate delivered 1‐ hour post‐LPS inhibited LPS‐induced caspase‐1 activity, and inhibited the augmented IL‐1β response triggered by combination viral dsRNA and LPS.

Conclusion
Magnesium sulfate differentially modulates LPS‐induced FM inflammation in a time‐dependent manner, in part through its modulation of caspase‐1 activity. Thus, the timing of MgSO4 administration may be critical in optimizing its anti‐inflammatory effects in the clinical setting.

MgSO4 might also be useful at preventing FM inflammation triggered by a polymicrobial viral‐bacterial infection.

@ljimbo423
 

ljimbo423

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Conclusion
Magnesium sulfate differentially modulates LPS‐induced FM inflammation in a time‐dependent manner, in part through its modulation of caspase‐1 activity.
That's really interesting!

I now wonder if other types of magnesium have a significant anti-inflammatory effect and does magnesium cross the blood brain barrier to possibly help with inflammation in the brain.

I have read here, that many people get noticeable benefits from magnesium. I do too. I take 700 mg a day of mag. citrate.
I see more research in my near future.:) Thanks for posting this patti!
 

pattismith

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In fact, I was on magnesium citrate for months, and I switched some days ago for magnesium threonate, and I got dramatic effects on it, both positives (/muscles, brain fog) and negatives (nausea, digestive issues, headache), so I am currently actively trying to understand what is happening.
Some PR members have already reported successes with it, so it is worth trying.:thumbsup:
 

pamojja

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Magnesium threonate is supposed to cross the BBB.
There was a thread at Longecity, where one member argued that oral Mg-threaonate wouldn't be better than Mg-sulfate IVs in crossing the BBB, if I remember the details right:

MAGNESIUM L-THREONATE is NO more effective than SULFATE form

PS: Personally tried all oral forms of magnesium to overcome a severe deficiency (malate, glycinate, ascorbate, threaonate, citrate, oxide, sulfate...) and found they work equally for me to alleviate very pain-full muscle-cramps somewhat, as long as the elemental magnesium would amount to the same. But only Mg-sulfate IVs ceased these cramps from deficiency. As always, your results may vary.
 
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pamojja

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We should be cautious in presuming that its the magnesium alone that is effective. Some of us may benefit more precisely because its a sulfate, we just do not know enough to be sure.
True. Also the oral Mg-sulfate I take is from a natural mineral water which, in divided elemental amounts, contains 1 g/L of magnesium and 2.1 g sulfate per liter. Of which I take a bit more than a liter a day. Each day. All I know who tried this mineral water can't take more than a glass, if at all due to it's taste, or they need to go to the toilet. While one IV only contains 486.1 mg of magnesium and about 4.4g Sulfate. Where it took about 6 IVs to cease the cramps completely within half a year. Beside continuing the high oral intake of now 2.6 g/d elemental Mg.

From this experience I can at least assume in my case oral intake doesn't gets absorbed or/and exceeded very vast for whatever reason. Which could only be circumvented with IVs.
 
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