Low dose Abilify for (severe) me/cfs?

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Dr. Bonilla at Stanford writes prescriptions for pretty much all his patients whether severe or not.
Dr. Montoya told me to keep away from it while he was still working at Stanford. Personally I have a problem
with using antipsychotic drugs on the patients without an approved trial. Seems to help a subset of patients though. We so desperately need biomarkers and better understanding of subsets..
 
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Dr. Bonilla at Stanford writes prescriptions for pretty much all his patients whether severe or not.
Dr. Montoya told me to keep away from it while he was still working at Stanford. Personally I have a problem
with using antipsychotic drugs on the patients without an approved trial. Seems to help a subset of patients though. We so desperately need biomarkers and better understanding of subsets..
That is interesting, thank you.

I do get your point, It could act as an anti-inflammatory though, I mean why are patients getting better?

It would also help if Dr. Bonilla would throw out some numbers (what % gets better) even though it is not formally studied yet.

I am not sure all patients can wait for studies (that will never be financed).

PS: Your quotation of Dr. Fluge is very interesting, I would think the same as he does, do you know when he said that?
 
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Dr. Bonilla throws out all kind of numbers of effectiveness. One patient reported he said 80% have a positive effect. Privately patients reports don't back those numbers up. The drug is is controversial even within the Stanford patient community.

I see your point on costs and time to have a trial on Abilify. We all have personal risk levels on what to try.
If you choose to try it I hope it gives you much needed relief.

The Dr. Fluge quote is a few years old. I can't remember when he said it. I think it was in regards to a metabolic paper they did.
 

percyval577

basal and ganglia
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Don´t try an antipsychotic, would be my advise from my experience.

Never ever, there should be reasons too, the DA system is very tiny and very important,
ppl can get severe side-effects, and they even can come to the daylight when the treatment already has stopped long time ago.

I personally tried an antipsychotic for one single time, and it was the worst decision I ever did.

To be "fair", I got quite a lot of insight out of it in terms how to treat my illness, this having said,
I found a way to reverse the medical impact, it´s still on its way, together with other mecfs nonsense.

I don´t know about Abilify in particular, I think it´s thought here to work against inflammation.
However, dangerous stuff, doctors in USA and Belgium, I think, have been sentenced.
In my opinion, these medicals should be absolutely restricted, qualitatively and maybe even quantitatively.
They are a "living death", really.
 
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Abilify can deplete B1, B2, folate, B12, calcium, K, melatonin, carnitine, CoQ10, etc.

https://www.optimallivingdynamics.c...diazepines-induced-guide-vitamins-medications

Many of these are needed to support mitochondrial function, especially B2, carnitine and CoQ10.

I see a top specialist (not at Stanford) and I have never heard of him prescribing Abilify. I also know patients who used to see Bonilla who found him to be very limited in his approach, and not adequately testing to identify underlying problems and using a wide variety of treatments that many of us have benefited from to address them.

In my mind, Abilify is a sledgehammer that's not specidic, can cause damage, and has withdrawal problems.

Curcumin and boswellia are excellent for reducing brain inflammation - I use both to reduce CNS swelling side effects of my IVIG treatment.