Low CO2, acidity and how to fix it

Tiger Lily 813

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Hi, I recently got a lab back that showed low CO2 (19 mmol/L. Range was 20-32). My doctor said it means I'm acidic and suggested alka seltzer gold or tri salts to alkalize, but minerals are a big risk for my sensitivities (I can take some supplements, but vitamins and minerals don't typically go well).

I was wondering if anyone had insight on other ways to fix this problem. I don't really know the cause (suspecting some kind of infection or virus reaction or maybe toxins), but I know this is important to manage. My main problem is weakness in my legs. I don't have many other symptoms.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated :)
 
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I don’t have much to offer here except to say that low CO2 usually indicates blood pH is too high (basic). That would mean you need to acidify, not alkalize.
Did your doctor check your potassium levels? Low levels can cause this.
You could also eliminate baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) from your diet and increase acidic foods like citrus.
 

Judee

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I read on one website today that "Kale and Avocado are some of the most alkaline vegetables there are."

I'm guessing Kale would be high in oxylates, something some ME people avoid, but can you do avocados?
 
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Tiger Lily 813

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@Springbok1988 thank you :) What’s crazy is, searching low CO2 levels in blood brings up a variety of reputable sources, reflecting both of these opposing views. Some say it is acidosis, others say alkalosis… I’m not sure how this info could be inconsistent? Thanks for bringing my attention to it. Maybe I should get pH strips for more data.
 

Crux

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Low CO2 isn't quite enough information. Other electrolytes need to be tested, then from there, hormones if indicated.
https://bestpractice.bmj.com/topics/en-us/1072

There are multiple reasons why disorders of blood chemistry may develop, including respiratory or renal disease, obesity, and medication. Resulting imbalances include acidosis (pH <7.35), alkalosis (pH >7.45), and high or low levels of key electrolyte ions, including sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, chloride, hydrogen phosphate, and hydrogen carbonate (bicarbonate). They may be acute or chronic, may occur with varying degrees of severity, and may not be sufficiently counteracted by the body's regulatory/compensatory mechanisms.
 

Crux

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I should add that if electrolytes are in 'normal' range, but on the high or low side, it may indicate something.

For instance, some researchers believe that if phosphorus is above 3.6 mg/dl , it may effect kidney and heart function. normal range : 2.5 -4.5 mg/dl.