Lipid peroxidation is elevated in female patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

Dolphin

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Free Full text at: http://www.medscimonit.com/fulltxt.php?ICID=881301

Lipid peroxidation is elevated in female patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

Brkic S, Tomic S, Maric D, Novakov Mikic A, Turkulov V.

Clinic for Infectious Diseases, Clinical Center Vojvodina, Novi Sad, Serbia.


Abstract

Background: Chronic fatigue syndrome is a debilitating disease of unclear cause and pathogenesis. It affects mostly women from lower socioeconomic classes. There is mounting evidence that oxidative stress, specifically lipid peroxidation (LPO) contributes to the disease process. We investigated levels of LPO and its possible consequences for these patients.<br /> Material/Methods: Forty women aged 15-45 years who fulfilled the 1994 Centers for Disease Control's diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) with no comorbidities were recruited and were age matched to a control group of 40 healthy women. Levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), LDL cholesterol (LDLc), HDL cholesterol (HDLc), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured.<br />

Results: Although initial statistical analyses showed no differences between groups (P=.345), when subdivided according to the level of MDA, a difference was found in the subgroup of high-level MDA (P=.034). There was a negative correlation between HDLc and MDA levels (r=0.3; P=.046), a positive correlation between TG and MDA levels (r=0.4; P=.006), and lower levels of HDL cholesterol in the CFS group (P=.036).<br />

Conclusions: High levels of MDA, positively correlated with TG and lower HDL levels, might be indicative of proatherogenic events in female CFS patients, a group not otherwise considered a risk for atherosclerosis.
 

Dolphin

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Studies show a reduction in atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk of 2% to 4% for each 1-mg/dL (0.025 mmol/L) increase in HDL-C.
The difference here is 1.41 mmol/L (healthy controls) vs 1.27 (CFS) = 0.14.

0.14/0.025=5.6

So one could say healthy controls appear to have a 5.6 x 2%-4%=11.2-22.4% reduction in atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk compared to people with CFS. Although such a linear relationship may not be accurate for this specific comparison.
 

pictureofhealth

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Important research from Serbia.
Seems to conclude that women with 'CFS' have higher levels of MDA (Malondialdehyde) & lower HDL so at risk of furred arteries.

Will check out MDA on Wiki .. not heard of before.

But 'CFS ... affects mostly women from lower socio economic classes' ???!!! Is that some 'gem' they picked up from the CDC website?!!
 

Dolphin

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But 'CFS ... affects mostly women from lower socio economic classes' ???!!! Is that some 'gem' they picked up from the CDC website?!!
They referenced three Leonard Jason papers. They were all actually from the one study (Chicago prevalence study).

What they used in the study was different (CFS group and control group):
social status (middle socioeconomic status, 82.5% vs 77.5%; high, 17.5% vs 22.5%; P=.78),
 

Dolphin

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Anyone else think the positive bit in this doesn't match Figure 3:
In the CFS group, several significant correlations were found.
There was a negative correlation between HDLc and MDA
levels (r=0.3; P=.046) (Figures 1, 2), and a positive correlation
between TG and MDA levels (r=0.4; P=.006) (Figures 3, 4).
There were no significant correlations between the levels
of TC, HDLc, TG, LDLc, and MDA in the control group.
To me, the regression line in Figure 3 looks like it is sloping down (a negative slope) (when one measures it, it slopes down) which would be a negative correlation. Maybe I'm missing something. I wrote to the authors but they claimed it is correct (although whether they looked again, I don't know).
 

Cort

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Important research from Serbia.
Seems to conclude that women with 'CFS' have higher levels of MDA (Malondialdehyde) & lower HDL so at risk of furred arteries.

Will check out MDA on Wiki .. not heard of before.

But 'CFS ... affects mostly women from lower socio economic classes' ???!!! Is that some 'gem' they picked up from the CDC website?!!
That's weird - the low socio-economic classes - how would they know; was this an epidemiological study? I don't think so. Jason found higher prevelance in Hispanics in Chicago I believe so it may be true - although with the vague definition you can fit alot in there....

whoops I missed that earlier comment.

Still high MDA backs up the MERUK study I believe and is consistent with every study on oxidative stress that I know of......another area begging for more research.
 

Dolphin

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Incidentally, in case anyone else is confused.
When I read the abstract initially, I thought the second line might apply to a subgroup.
Although initial statistical analyses showed no differences between groups (P=.345), when subdivided according to the level of MDA, a difference was found in the subgroup of high-level MDA (P=.034). There was a negative correlation between HDLc and MDA levels (r=0.3; P=.046), a positive correlation between TG and MDA levels (r=0.4; P=.006), and lower levels of HDL cholesterol in the CFS group (P=.036).
However the full paper makes clear that it is the whole group they are referring to.
 

Dolphin

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Still high MDA backs up the MERUK study I believe and is consistent with every study on oxidative stress that I know of......another area begging for more research.
Yes, I think this research backs up MERUK (and some other) research. Nice to have an area with a bit of consistency.
 

Cort

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Yeah, its really a strong area.....so that suggests an inflammatory state to me...if they could just tie down where its coming from...

Then theres heart rate variability, low blood volume, NK cell problems, immune activation, some HPA axis problems...I'm sure there's more.how do they all fit together??? Hopefully XMRV will be the tie that binds.