Lane, Hosking (2010) The pathogenesis of murine coronavirus infection of the central

WillowJ

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Lane TE, Hosking MP. "The pathogenesis of murine coronavirus infection of the central nervous system." Crit Rev Immunol. 2010;30(2):119-30. PMID: 20370625

Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-3900, USA.
Abstract

Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) is a positive-strand RNA virus that causes an acute encephalomyelitis that later resolves into a chronic fulminating demyelinating disease. Cytokine production, chemokine secretion, and immune cell infiltration into the central nervous system are critical to control viral replication during acute infection. Despite potent antiviral T-lymphocyte activity, sterile immunity is not achieved, and MHV chronically persists within oligodendrocytes. Continued infiltration and activation of the immune system, a result of the lingering viral antigen and RNA within oligodendrocytes, lead directly to the development of an immune-mediated demyelination that bears remarkable similarities, both clinically and histologically, to the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. MHV offers a unique model system for studying host defense during acute viral infection and immune-mediated demyelination during chronic infection.
 

WillowJ

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interesting that this starts with an acute infection in mice. That isn't present in human MS, is it?
 

Cort

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They have apparently really looked into what triggers relapses in MS - and infections do and stress can - and other things don't. Interesting that some periods of pregnancy appear to be good for MS and others bad - which I think is true for CFS. Here is some information on triggers....from Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiple_sclerosis


Multiple sclerosis relapses are often unpredictable, occurring without warning and without obvious inciting factors with a rate rarely above one and a half per year.[1] Some attacks, however, are preceded by common triggers. Relapses occur more frequently during spring and summer.[16] Viral infections such as the common cold, influenza, or gastroenteritis increase the risk of relapse.[1] Stress may also trigger an attack.[17] Pregnancy affects the susceptibility to relapse, with a lower relapse rate at each trimester of gestation. During the first few months after delivery, however, the risk of relapse is increased.[1] Overall, pregnancy does not seem to influence long-term disability. Many potential triggers have been examined and found not to influence MS relapse rates. There is no evidence that vaccination and breast feeding,[1] physical trauma,[18] or Uhthoff's phenomenon[16] are relapse triggers.
 

WillowJ

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triggers of relapses are interesting--thanks for doing the search for me (I was lazy last night because it was late). I was interested in initial onset, too.

WebMD says,
The most common early symptoms of MS include:

* Tingling
* Numbness
* Loss of balance
* Weakness in one or more limbs
* Blurred or double vision

Less common symptoms of MS may include:

* Slurred speech
* Sudden onset of paralysis
* Lack of coordination
* Cognitive difficulties
I found an interesting case report of atypical onset of MS with silent coeliac disease and autoimmune hepatitis; they're saying "inflammatory immune-mediated damage of the CNS triggered by gluten could not be excluded" and MS-like disease with MRI abnormalities is a small subset in coeliacs.