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Intestinal bacteria that produce Ammonia

Carl

Senior Member
Messages
356
Location
United Kingdom
Your topic title is not really correct, Urease positive ie ammonia producing micro-organisms can occupy many different places in humans and not just the intestines. They can be present in the urinary track, mouth, stomach to name a few places.

I think that you should look at the most likely places, where the most ammonia will be produced. This will be where there is an ample supply of urea which the Urease enzyme will turn into ammonia and carbon dioxide. Ammonia is quite highly base which can neutralise acid. Couple that with the stomach and this can result in hypochlorhydria and gas. An acid challenge test might indicate their presence by producing wind/burp. Ammonia carbonate can be formed which might not cause so much gas and therefore it might not be so easily detectable by such a simple test. An acid challenge does show burping in me. This may or may not be the micro-organism which causes CFS depending on it's location, it could be merely a co-infection.

Staphylococcus spp. can be Urease positive and so can Nocardia spp.
Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter freundii, Ochrobactrum intermedium, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori, Proteus vulgaris, Ureaplasma urealyticum & Staphylococcus capitis subsp. ureolyticus, Cryptococcus neoformans & Cryptococcus gattii to name a few.

A note:
Histamine which is needed to stimulate stomach acid production also causes vasodilation

Urease-positive bacteria other than Helicobacter pylori in human gastric juice and mucosa Brandi et al 2006

Urease-positive bacteria in the stomach induce a false-positive reaction in a urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection Osaki et al 2008

If you search for Urease bacteria, yeasts, fungi, microorganisms then you should turn up a great deal of results.
 

Carl

Senior Member
Messages
356
Location
United Kingdom
Proteus spp, Cryptococcus spp, Corynebacterium spp, Yersinia spp, Brucella spp a few more species that can be urease positive but I have not checked whether they are found in the digestive system.
 

WoolPippi

Senior Member
Messages
556
Location
Netherlands
Hi,
Does anyone know which intestinal bacteria produce Ammonia?
do you ask because you smell ammonia when you're on the toilet?

if so, I produce ammonia when I've taken a supplement with ground up animal glands or have eaten a lot of protein. It's an overflow from cells not being able to process the methylation cycle correctly and filling up with ammonia. Not a good thing.

No ammonia smell if I aid the cycle with a supplement called phosphatidylserine.
 

brenda

Senior Member
Messages
2,263
Location
UK
When I was on the high fat low carb medium protein diet I could small ammonia regarding urine, but since I have adopted a plant based one, the smell has gone completely which I pressume is a good sign.
 

Lalia

Senior Member
Messages
127
Location
Australia
I found Yucca helpful with ammonia clearance, but I know it has some effect on estrogen in the body so best to do some research before trying.