Insomnia ideas?

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I was always intrigued by LDN to treat insomnia, but did not want to try it because of all the reports I had read of people having increased insomnia when they were first on it. I finally tried LDN, and it has helped so much with my sleep. I had other side effects at first, but it helped my sleep some from the beginning, and that beneficial effect grew the longer I was on it.

I'm on 2 MG of transdermal LDN, which I apply to my skin at night. The transdermal form is not as well absorbed or well studied at the oral form, but my doctor recommends it for uber sensitive patients like me who also have gut issues. It works for me. I still have to take sleep meds and supplements, though.
This is a surprising way to improve sleep. Never heard about it before.
Might even give it a try, since melatonin helps me fall asleep faster, but makes me wake up in the middle of night.

Have you experienced any side effects from using LDN ? Isn't there any addiction associated with it ? (sorry for the akward questions, I do not know anything much about Naltrexone)
 

consuegra

Senior Member
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I was always intrigued by LDN to treat insomnia, but did not want to try it because of all the reports I had read of people having increased insomnia when they were first on it. I finally tried LDN, and it has helped so much with my sleep. I had other side effects at first, but it helped my sleep some from the beginning, and that beneficial effect grew the longer I was on it.

I'm on 2 MG of transdermal LDN, which I apply to my skin at night. The transdermal form is not as well absorbed or well studied at the oral form, but my doctor recommends it for uber sensitive patients like me who also have gut issues. It works for me. I still have to take sleep meds and supplements, though.

Where do you get the LDN compounded?
Chris
 
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Hi, Chris. I live in Austin, TX, and get my LDN at a compounding pharmacy.

About your previous question, no, I haven't experienced side effects from LDN aside from a little initial daytime spaciness. I take mine before bedtime because using it in the day really sedates me. Lots of other people do take it during the day, so it can take awhile to figure out what works best for you.

Have you considered CBD oil for sleep? It really helps me. It's also good for inflammation and the lower digestive tract. It's important with CBD to get a good brand. It comes in either single or broad spectrum, and the broad spectrum seems to work best for me. Here's the one I use, and it's the one my doctor recommends now. I've built up to 25 MG in the unflavored drops:

https://waayb.com/

If you are waking in the middle of the night, I'd try a cortisol-lowering supplement. I like Gaia Herbs Sleepthru. I take 3 before bed:

https://www.amazon.com/Gaia-Herbs-S...13QvyAyhQL&preST=_SY300_QL70_&dpSrc=srch&th=1

Occasionally, I'll still wake in the middle of the night, and then I"ll take an additional Sleepthru and rub the Waayb 5 MG transdermal on my hand. This gets me another 3 hours of sleep.

I'm also using the 5 MG transdermal on my elderly cat, who has IBS and an enlarged pancreas. It's improved her digestion, sleep, and appetite. I rub it on the inside of her ears, which she doesn't like, but it's better than prying her mouth open to put drops in. She's back to strutting around the house and flouting our rule about not jumping up on the kitchen counters. Before the CBD, she was so sick we had an appt. to have her put to sleep.

Good luck, Chris. If my insomnia can get better, anyone's can.
 
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Might even give it a try, since melatonin helps me fall asleep faster, but makes me wake up in the middle of night.
I've had that experience with melatonin also, but it depends on the amount (1 mg or less).

I've just started experimenting with larger doses. I took 5 mg night before last, and 10 mg last night. Strangely, neither dose actually made me sleepy within an hour of taking them, but I dreamt a lot more last night than I usually do.

Melatonin is known to be a powerful antioxidant. I suspect that for me and others with ME/CFS, much of the melatonin we take is being consumed to counter the inflammation in our brains, so we must take larger doses if we want to have any left over to function as a sleep aide. I'd suspect this to be the case for anyone who doesn't get the expected drowsiness from taking melatonin.