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Infrequent chelation. Harmful or helpful?

TheChosenOne

Senior Member
Messages
209
The idea of frequent chelation is to mimize the damage done by moving around mercury.
Now, what if a person actually feels better on chelation supplements? Everytime I take a capsule of DMPS, I get almost immediate relief from mercury related symptoms.
What's behind the idea that you have to take chelation supplements frequently, besides the redistribution problem? Eventually, the mercury will be chelated out anyway.
 

helen1

Senior Member
Messages
1,033
Location
Canada
The idea behind frequent dose chelation is that the redistribution of mercury only happens once a week when you stop chelating for a few days. This is assuming you're chelating every day. In frequent dose chelation, chelator levels stay even to keep the mercury bound to it and excreting regularly. This continues for about 4 days, then stops for a few days, which is when the mercury detaches from disappearing chelators and redistributes itself in your body.

If you're only chelating once a day, mercury attaches to it, gets excreted, then as the chelator vanishes, mercury detaches itself and redistributes itself in your body. The problem is this happens every day if you chelate only once a day.
 

TheChosenOne

Senior Member
Messages
209
Yes. But the fact that you feel better on it (and after it), isn't that indicative that the damage dealt by the redistribution is actually minor compared to the possible benefit?
 

helen1

Senior Member
Messages
1,033
Location
Canada
That's interesting isn't it and could be what's happening. But the long-term consequences of mercury poisoning are pretty dire.