If you have extreme chemical sensitivities which change your brain function, or you are the caregiver for such a person, could you please post here?

Hope4

Desert of SW USA
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Chemical poisoning, also known as chemical sensitivity, can alter brain function, as the chemicals "grab" different nerves.

If this happens to your brain, or to someone you care for, would you be willing to post how you recognize the onset, or upcoming onset, or the "brain hi-jacking"?

When it happens, how do you deal with it? How do you recover from it?

Are you able to prevent this brain hi-jacking?
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If you are the caregiver:

What have you found helps you to recognize the soon-to-happen brain hi-jacking? How do you help the person you are caring for?

Thanks very much. :)
 
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outdamnspot

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I suffer from this. I currently live at home with 4 other people who aren't sensitive to the condition. What I've noticed is that my brain will often become hypervigilant/switch to 'high alert mode' before I even recognize the offending scent, which tells me the reactions are real (I used to worry it was a kind of placebo); so I may be sitting in my room, minding my own business on my laptop, and then out of nowhere my brain darts to attention; several seconds later, I'll realize someone has sprayed cologne, or air freshener etc.

I have frequent ice showers throughout the day for my fatigue and anxiety, and sometimes these can help ease the reactions too.
 

andyguitar

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I used to be a part-time paid helper for someone with severe ME. They had multiple chemical sensitivities and bad reactions to light, noise and smells. I never found a way of stopping the reactions. So have to say that avoidance is the best way of dealing with it. But something of interest is the fact that these sort of sensitivities are common in Migraine. So if you get those a successful treatment for that it might reduce the sensitive reactions.
 

Hope4

Desert of SW USA
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I, myself, find this very difficult to live with. I am not able right now to elaborate on it, but will try to, during the next few days.
Thank you for asking, @Hope4
Shoshana, thanks. :). I will enjoy your post.

I suffer from this. I currently live at home with 4 other people who aren't sensitive to the condition....
ODS, :). I'm sorry you are in that situation. Avoidance of volatile oil compounds is vital. I am sending you good thoughts. Thanks for the cold shower idea. Showers help me, but they aren't possible for the person I'm helping.

...multiple chemical sensitivities and bad reactions to light, noise and smells. I never found a way of stopping the reactions. ...But something of interest is the fact that these sort of sensitivities are common in Migraine. So if you get those a successful treatment for that it might reduce the sensitive reactions.
Andyguitar, thanks for reminding me about the migraine symptoms, and for your kind thoughts. :)

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There is an actual chemical hi-jacking that occurs in chemical poisoning. When a needle gets stuck on a record, it can't get out of the groove. When the chemicals grab the nerve synapses, the person can only wait for the chemical grabbing to fade away.

The people I know who have this happen to them, say that they cannot control it. They just have to wait until it subsides. These people have such extreme MCS/CI and multi-sensory sensitivity that they are shut-ins.

Once in a while, I am able to do something that gets that "needle out of the groove", but the ability to make the change seems to depend on the severity of the chemical "hi-jacking". The chemical "hi-jackings" change a person's way of speaking, his or her emotional reactions, and preempts the ability to control oneself in many ways. It is an extreme reaction. To me, it looks as severe as someone having spasms or a small seizure.

In this video about chemical poisoning, which is politely named chemical sensitivity, there is a section from 16:09, for almost three minutes, of a woman who has extreme neurological symptoms from chemical poisoning. The first time I saw this video, and saw this woman, it really woke me up to the extent to which everyday poisons could ruin someone's life.





Albert Donnay, the toxicologist, has said that there is nothing to do but wait for the "grabbing" of the chemical to subside. His website is: http://www.mcsrr.org


I am hoping, firmly, to find a way to do things, pouring in love, which will "derail" or bypass those chemical grabbings.