Hydrogen gas: from clinical medicine to an emerging ergogenic molecule for sports athletes

nanonug

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Interesting agent, this H2...

Abstract

H2 has been clinically demonstrated to provide anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, which makes it an attractive agent in exercise medicine. Although exercise provides a multiplicity of benefits including decreased risk of disease, it can also have detrimental effects. For example, chronic high-intensity exercise in elite athletes, or sporadic bouts of exercise (i.e. noxious exercise) in untrained individuals, result in similar pathological factors such as inflammation, oxidation and cellular damage that arise from and result in disease. Paradoxically, exercise-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species largely mediate the benefits of exercise. Ingestion of conventional antioxidants and anti-inflammatories often impairs exercise-induced training adaptations. Disease and noxious forms of exercise promote redox dysregulation and chronic inflammation, changes which are mitigated by H2 administration. Beneficial exercise and H2 administration promote cytoprotective hormesis, mitochondrial biogenesis, ATP production, increased NAD+/NADH ratio, cytoprotective phase II enzymes, heat-shock proteins, sirtuins, etc. We review the biomedical effects of exercise and those of H2, and propose that hydrogen may act as an exercise mimetic and redox adaptogen, potentiate the benefits from beneficial exercise, and reduce the harm from noxious exercise. However, more research is warranted to elucidate the potential ergogenic and therapeutic effects of H2 in exercise medicine.
 

Hip

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I've experimented with drinking hydrogen rich water (HRW) — water in which hydrogen gas is dissolved, usually at high pressure. This is the usual way H2 gas is consumed for its antioxidant effects, and its ghrelin-stimulating effects. You can now buy lots of kits that allow you to make HRW at home.

I find HRW does help the emotional sensitivity / stress sensitivity symptom of ME/CFS quite noticeably, but did not help with any other ME/CFS symptoms. Some info in this post.
 
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sb4

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I messed around with some H2 about a year ago, didn't notice much. If I remember right you can get it by mixing magnesium with malate or something. I also tried tablet versions.
 
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Just FYI: To create H2, when talking about magnesium, you need the pure 100% elemental magnesium metal (comes in sticks/bars, pellets, shavings, strips, grains, or powder) + a weak acid (a salt of malate, glycinate, citrate, etc) dissolved in water.