High dose of vitamin C, any experience?

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Hey there everyone,
For various reasons I consider trying high dosis of vitamin C. Some of them being inflammation in my body, chronic swollen lymph nodes without a clear reason, adrenal problems (low aldosterone).
And so much more, too much to name.

I was wondering about experiences of others, if you tried:
How much did you take? Which type? What did it do for you?
And are there any risks I should be aware of?

I have 250mg tables, and want to take 2 (so 500mg) every 30 minutes, until my bowels react to it. Then I stop and use that dose (slightly less) the next day.
I have ascorbic acid, which is probably not the best right? What would be better?

Loads of thanks in advance :)

(Edit:
Diagnosed with POTS and low aldosterone.
Chronic fatigue since I was 16, (33 now) Often have hypotension and low heart rate/bradycardie, but no adrenal insufficiency. It started after having Epstein Barr/cytomegaly virus.
Medication: Only fludrocortisone)
 
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David Jackson

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Hi Julia,

I say go for it; see what you can get up to.

I take 5ml of ascorbic acid, 4 times a day, and think I could get away with much more However, even from this amount I saw an improvement.

Check out Andrew Saul on YouTube for info on Vitamin C megadosing :)
 

Research 1st

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I would check your blood Vitamin C levels first before taking masses of Vitamin C. If you have low Vitamin C it will help, if not, you just pee it out and waste your money. Hopefully it will help you by giving you stronger immunity to common colds etc.
 

JES

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Ascorbic acid may be too acidic for your stomach, and it has the bowel tolerance issue. A better form would be liposomal vitamin C, which in my experience has neither of these side effects. Vitamin C plasma levels have been found to correlate inversely with EBV antibody levels (source), so it makes sense to trial Vitamin C if you suspect EBV.
 

CFS_for_19_years

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I know how great it feels to take a lot of Vitamin C. One time long ago in the middle of a cold or flu I took 22gm of Vitamin C before I ever developed diarrhea. My cold/flu symptoms felt much better. I don't recall how long I persisted in taking Vitamin C, and most of the time I took mineral ascorbates (Vitamin C bound to magnesium, calcium, zinc). Eventually I developed stress fractures in my feet. The radiologist could not explain why this was happening. He asked, "What have you been doing to your feet?" I wasn't bedbound at the time, and prior to developing the stress fractures, I was able to walk 20-30 minutes per day.

Be careful with taking excessive amounts of Vitamin C. It may be OK for the short term, but long term it will pull minerals from your body. I think I developed stress fractures due to excessive intake of Vitamin C. My bones had become depleted of minerals. Some time later when I saw a naturopath she told me to not take more than 2000mg of Vitamin C per day.

http://www.acu-cell.com/vitc.html#overdose
http://www.acu-cell.com/vitc.html#copper
Chronic conjunctivitis (or blepharitis) can occur when higher copper stores are gradually depleted following the practice of regularly overdosing on Vitamin C

Vitamin C lowers Zinc directly, and it lowers it indirectly by supporting Iron absorption, so while a higher
intake of ascorbic acid would likely benefit those suffering from some forms of anemia, leukemia, left-sided
ovarian cysts, or from prostatitis, the same higher Vitamin C intake would worsen certain liver conditions
(hemochromatosis), benign prostatic hypertrophy, or more serious kidney diseases (renal failure).

Larger amounts of Vitamin C lower Manganese levels and aid greater insulin production in those capable of
producing insulin, which may be beneficial for Type II diabetics, but it would worsen those with hypoglycemic
tendencies that exhibit low sodium, since sodium slows insulin response, so a very high intake of Vitamin C
would create larger insulin spikes. By lowering manganese, very high doses of Vitamin C also affect (lower)
glycogen stores in the liver.

Calcium metabolism is much affected by Vitamin C intake. Patients who suffer from calcium overload
benefit from supplementing larger daily amounts of Vitamin C because they prevent calcium from calcifying
soft tissue. Low stomach acid levels are also a common side effect of elevated calcium, for which a higher
Vitamin C intake is beneficial as well.

While the right amount of ascorbic acid increases bioavailability of calcium, very high intake of Vitamin C,
if not needed, will eventually put extra demands on calcium stores (bone) and result in calcium deficiency,
which can lead to osteopenia, or eventually osteoporosis.

The "Bowel Tolerance Challenge" - recommended by some doctors - to determine the optimal intake of
Vitamin C by ingesting increasing amounts of ascorbic acid until diarrhea sets in, then reducing Vitamin C
to a tolerated dose, only measures one's tolerance to the type of ascorbate, and the amounts used, but it
does not reflect optimal Vitamin C intake to achieve optimal benefits.

High levels / Overdose / Toxicity / Negative Side Effects - Symptoms and/or Risk Factors:
Diarrhea, abdominal cramps, high stomach acid, increased urination, insomnia, irritability, PMS, joint pains,
calcium deficiency, osteoporosis, headaches, hypoglycemia, weakness, anemia, reduced estrogen, reduced
progesterone, reduced prolactin; may increase infections by causing copper or zinc deficiency.
Here are some examples of mineral ascorbate products:
https://www.amazon.com/Roex-Vitamin-Mineral-Ascorbates-Tablets/dp/B006UNUTNO
http://www.integratedhealth.com/supplements/vitamin-c-products/buffered-c-powder-8-oz.html
 

Learner1

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I would check your blood Vitamin C levels first before taking masses of Vitamin C. If you have low Vitamin C it will help, if not, you just pee it out and waste your money. Hopefully it will help you by giving you stronger immunity to common colds etc.
This is utter nonsense. I had high dose IV vitamin C (50-75g) to treat my stage 3 uterine cancer. I am now cancer free...

https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/hp/vitamin-c-pdq

Mark Levine at NIH found there is bowel tolerance but IVC brings blood levels up higher than oral.

https://irp.nih.gov/pi/mark-levine

As for CFS:

https://www.google.com/url?q=http:/...ggPMAE&usg=AFQjCNHkmgTE8U003TO00kqwfoAF3YBlsA

For infections:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10543583

https://riordanclinic.org/2014/02/h...s-a-successful-treatment-of-viral-infections/
 

pamojja

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JES

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:
Beside comprehensive supplementation I've taken in average 23 g of ascorbic acid per day for the last 9 years. Experienced massive benefits. As already posted elsewhere:
The Linus Pauling recommendation of 6-18 mg was not established scientifically. Linus Pauling Institute now recommends "only" 400 mg:
Based on the combined evidence from metabolic, pharmacokinetic, and observational studies and from randomized controlled trials, it has been argued that sufficient scientific evidence exists to support an optimum, daily vitamin C intake of at least 200 mg/day, which is substantially higher than the current RDA (11). Studies conducted at the National Institutes of Health showed that plasma and circulating cells in healthy, young subjects attained near-maximal concentrations of vitamin C at a dose of 400 mg/day (11). Because of the very high benefit-to-risk ratio of vitamin C supplementation, and to ensure tissue and body saturation of vitamin C in almost all healthy people, the Linus Pauling Institute recommends a vitamin C intake of at least 400 mg daily for adult men and women.
In order to get higher plasma levels of vitamin C than from 400 mg, the only way would be to use IV (significantly higher) or liposomal vitamin C (somewhat higher).
 
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pamojja

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The Linus Pauling recommendation of 6-18 mg was not established scientifically. The Linus Pauling institute now recommends "only" 400 mg:
If one looks at the actual science and the context, one finds that low dose recommended by LPI has rather to do with financial considerations: https://firstlaw.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/oops-they-got-it-wrong/

In order to get higher plasma levels of vitamin C than from 400 mg, the only way would be to use IV (significantly higher) or liposomal vitamin C (somewhat higher).
Only if you follow the standard assessment by giving up to 2.5 g of vitamin C while testing serum levels. And arrive at serum levels of higher intakes via extrapolation only. Any study testing levels, finds these generally accepted speculations not true:

Journal of the New Zealand Medical Association, 23-August-2002, Vol 115 No 1160

Glycohaemoglobin and ascorbic acid

Copplestone et al1 (http://www.nzma.org....al/115-1157/25/) identified misleading glycohaemoglobin (GHb) results due to a haemoglobin variant (Hb D Punjab) and listed a number of other possible causes for such false results (ie, haemolytic anaemia, uraemia, lead poisoning, alcoholism, high-dose salicylates and hereditary persistence of foetal haemoglobin).

We have observed a significant "false" lowering of GHb in animals and humans supplementing ascorbic acid (AA) at multigram levels. Mice receiving ~7.5 mg/d (equivalent to > 10 g/day in a 70 kg human) exhibited no decrease in plasma glucose, but a 23% reduction in GHb.2 In humans, supplementation of AA for several months did not lower fasting plasma glucose.3,4 We studied 139 consecutive consenting non-diabetic patients in an oncology clinic. The patients had been encouraged as part of their treatment to supplement AA. Self-reported daily intake varied from 0 to 20 g/day. The plasma AA levels ranged from 11.4 to 517 µmol/L and correlated well with the reported intake. Regression analysis of their GHb and plasma AA values showed a statistically significant inverse association (eg, each 30 µmol/L increase in plasma AA concentration resulted in a decrease of 0.1 in GHb). (follow link to read further)
 
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In the OP said 1g every waking hour, spread out in half-hourly doses.
Now that would be a high dose, and one that would be difficult to maintain.

I have taken buffered Vitamin C at those doses and been surprised by rapidly reducing cold symptoms. Within a few hours.

I couldn't sustain such consumption though, it's expensive.

I take 2 grams daily, probably only 2/3 what I need, but I take it every day. ;)
 
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pamojja

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I couldn't sustain such consumption though, it's expensive.
Actually my 23 g/d being the highest dose of any supplement I take, it is also the cheapest one. Widely available here in supermarkets for 1.95€ per 100g bottle. Even cheaper if one orders wholesale online. At such high doses for many years I wouldn't take pills or capsules, since they all come with fillers/binders I wouldn't want at such high doses.
 

CFS_for_19_years

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Vitamin C can interfere with other lab tests besides glycohemoglobin (HbA1C).

Influence of Vitamin C on Urine Dipstick Test Results
http://www.annclinlabsci.org/content/45/4/391.long
To reduce costs, ‘normal’ UA test results are not usually followed up with additional confirmatory tests. However, the results of this study show that overlooking the presence of vitamin C in urine may lead to potentially serious false-negative results, especially for glucose and blood. Thus, a vitamin C-resistant strip or a strip with a vitamin C indicator is a preferred solution. For specimens positive for vitamin C, the results should be reported with a comment, such as “Vitamin C in urine can cause false-negative results for glucose and blood cells. Repeating a test after restriction of vitamin C consumption is recommended,” or the specimens should be subjected to additional follow-up analyses.
Influence of Large Doses of Ascorbic Acid on Laboratory Test Results
http://clinchem.aaccjnls.org/content/clinchem/24/1/54.full.pdf
 

pamojja

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Have you noticed a significant difference in benefit from that dose vs. 2 or 3 grams a day?
Already linked to posts which would answer that question. Short answer is not comparable.

Beside comprehensive supplementation I've taken in average 23 g of ascorbic acid per day for the last 9 years. Experienced massive benefits. As already posted elsewhere:

 

outdamnspot

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Does anyone know if Vit C can cause a 'detox' reaction? I take 2-3g of time-release to help me sleep; I noticed a reaction yesterday that resembled the herxes I get on certain herbs (intense apathy, brain fog, depression, GI upset). Last night I upped the dose to 5g and today I feel flu-like with a raging headache etc.
 

pamojja

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Does anyone know if Vit C can cause a 'detox' reaction? ..(intense apathy, brain fog, depression, GI upset).
I never experienced detox reactions with very high doses. GI upset are usually is a sign you're getting close to bowel tolerance, which also can change a lot over time. Dr. Levy though, talks a lot about it's detox properties, for example here:
 

outdamnspot

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I never experienced detox reactions with very high doses. GI upset are usually is a sign you're getting close to bowel tolerance, which also can change a lot over time.
I am aware of bowel tolerance -- though my symptoms aren't restricted to the stomach, which is why I thought something else might be going on. I do know, though, that the concept of 'die-off', 'detox' etc. is a bit contested, so hence wasn't sure.