HHV-6 researcher Dr Bhupesh Prusty also finds "something in the serum" of ME/CFS patients

Hip

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Fluge and Mella in 2016 showed that when myoblast cells (young muscle cells) from healthy people were exposed to the blood serum of ME/CFS patients, the cells developed energy metabolism abnormalities.

That suggested that there is "something in the serum" of ME/CFS patients which is amiss, because even when healthy cells come into contact ME/CFS patients' serum they develop energy metabolism issues.

Prof Ron Davis also found evidence that something in the serum is affecting ME/CFS patients cells (see this thread).



@Cort's latest blog from the NIH ME/CFS Conference II details the work of German HHV-6 researcher Dr Bhupesh Prusty, who is now the third scientist to find "something in the serum" in ME/CFS patients.

Dr Prusty's has previously found that HHV-6 reactivation in cells changes mitochondrial structure and function.

But intriguingly, Prusty's research suggests this not only happens in HHV-6-infected cells, but even in healthy cells by some unknown mechanism or factor that remotely alters the mitochondria in uninfected cells as well (some info here).



Prusty's latest finding is that this mitochondrial-altering factor transmits via the blood serum, because when he added ME/CFS patients' serum to healthy cells, their mitochondria began to break up.

And when he added to healthy cells the supernatant (liquid) taken from a HHV-6 infection in cell culture, this also caused the same changes in the mitochondria.

And then removing removing ME/CFS patients’ serum from the cells caused the mitochondria to return to a healthy state again.

Prusty is now attempting to isolate this mitochondrial inhibiting factor from the serum. He is using the exosomes that Maureen Hanson is examining in her NIH research center.


Some articles about Dr Prusty's work:
SMCI 2016 RAMSAY TEAM 5 RESEARCH UPDATE
HHV-6 MEDIATED MITOCHONDRIAL MODULATION AND ITS ASSOCIATION TO ME/CFS
 
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junkcrap50

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Fantastic news. Glad another person besides Ron Davis is looking for the "something in the blood." Are Fluge & Mella also trying to identify the "something"? I haven't heard anything about them persuing this line of research.

Prusty is now attempting to isolate this mitochondrial inhibiting factor from the serum. He is using the exosomes that Maureen Hanson is examining in her NIH research center.
What does this mean? How does using exosomes help isolate the inhibiting factor? Is he just trying to find a match to the inhibiting factor?

EDIT: I'm aware of what exosome are and what they do. But Hip's and Cort's sentences about using exosomes is too matter of fact and vague.
 
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Exosomes come from inside the cell. Specifically, from the multivesicular body (MVB). The MVB can contain coxsackie viruses according to this paper: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3993817/

What if the only viruses in our blood are hidden inside exosomes and so cannot easily be found?

They are, let's say, absorbed by another cell and a range of immune and metabolic alterations is set in train, including mitochondrial fission.
 

Hip

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They are, let's say, absorbed by another cell and a range of immune and metabolic alterations is set in train, including mitochondrial fission.
As I understand it, I believe Dr Bhupesh Prusty is proposing that some factor (such as an immune signaling molecule) may be transmitted from HHV-6-infected cells to uninfected cells, and it is this factor which he thinks may be causing the uninfected cells to also develop mitochondrial alterations.

This factor appears to exist in the serum, and may or may not be inside exosomes.
 
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Dr Bhupesh Prusty, who is now the third scientist to find "something in the serum" in ME/CFS patients.
I believe that Karl Morten was the third scientist to find "something in the serum" in ME/CFS patients. This is slide 44 showing the result of his muscle cell experiment from his New Zealand presentation at the end of last year.
KarlMortenPlasmaSwap.JPG

Exciting times. I was impressed by the out of box thinking of these scientists - I hope Karl Morten and Bhupesh Prusty can get funding to continue their search for the "something" in the blood.
 

junkcrap50

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I believe that Karl Morten was the third scientist to find "something in the serum" in ME/CFS patients. This is slide 44 showing the result of his muscle cell experiment from his New Zealand presentation at the end of last year.
Exciting times. I was impressed by the out of box thinking of these scientists - I hope Karl Morten and Bhupesh Prusty can get funding to continue their search for the "something" in the blood.
Do you know of Dr. Morten is pursuing identifying the "something in the blood" that he's discovered? Need as many hands on deck in trying to ID it since it's seems to be confirmed by now 4 researchers.
 

Wally

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Does anyone happen to know if the “something” that Hanson, Prusty and/or Morten have seen in the serum of ME/CFS patients may be a “particle” in the same size range as Ron Davis is investigating?
 
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Hip

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Nice summary of the four studies which have found "something in the serum (or in the plasma)" here.


Note that plasma is obtained by allowing a blood sample to stand in a test tube for an hour, such that the cells clump together and fall the bottom of the tube. The pale yellow liquid that collects above these clumped cells is the plasma. Plasma is 90% water.

Thus plasma is the blood with the red cells and white cells removed. But plasma still contains the clotting factors which are present in the blood.

Serum is the plasma with the clotting factors removed.

Plasma and serum are very similar.