Gut Bacteria Linked to Depression Identified

Jackb23

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“In their manuscript entitled ‘The neuroactive potential of the human gut microbiota in quality of life and depression’ Jeroen Raes and his team studied the relation between gut bacteria and quality of life and depression. The authors combined faecal microbiome data with general practitioner diagnoses of depression from 1,054 individuals enrolled in the Flemish Gut Flora Project. They identified specific groups of microorganisms that positively or negatively correlated with mental health. The authors found that two bacterial genera, Coprococcus and Dialister, were consistently depleted in individuals with depression, regardless of antidepressant treatment. The results were validated in an independent cohort of 1,063 individuals from the Dutch LifeLinesDEEP cohort and in a cohort of clinically depressed patients at the University Hospitals Leuven, Belgium.”


“The first population-level study on the link between gut bacteria and mental health identifies specific gut bacteria linked to depression and provides evidence that a wide range of gut bacteria can produce neuroactive compounds. Jeroen Raes (VIB-KU Leuven) and his team published these results today in the scientific journal Nature Microbiology.”


https://neurosciencenews.com/depression-gut-bacteria-10685/

 

ljimbo423

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Thanks for the link @Jackb23, good info!

Butyrate-producing Faecalibacterium and Coprococcus bacteria were consistently associated with higher quality of life indicators.

Together with Dialister, Coprococcus spp. were also depleted in depression, even after correcting for the confounding effects of antidepressants.
All the more reason for me to keep eating my butter. :) Butter has about 3-4% butyric acid or butyrate. Which is about 500 mg butyrate per serving, which is one tablespoon.
 
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Dialister and Coprococcus, so how do we get these dudes back?

They are not part of any probiotic on the market.
 

Jackb23

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Hoping for someone to now study the mechanism and pathways that these bacteria’s travel in- all the way up until they reach the brain. Would be interesting if their byproducts found themselves involved in the kynurenine pathway in any way. Would also merge several different fields of illness/study and potentially help our funding second handedly.
 

bjl218

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Jackb23

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This is certainly encouraging. Now hopefully someone will do a follow-up study in which they give depressed patients these probiotics to see if it effectively treats depression. Interestingly, there have already been studies on the effect of butyrate on depression:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4368891/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25233278
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006899317305383

I don’t want to assume, but would supplementing with Sodium Butyrate be of any benefit? Has anyone tried?