Foods high in antioxidants/ORAC value list? My way to recovery

pamojja

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Where id you pick up your herbal information @pamojja? Any good sources to recommend?
When I suffered a whole year from a severe chronic bronchitis in 2012 I threw the towel and went to an South Indian beach for 5 month, where I started to learn and use Ayurvedic herbals. Thereby got rid of the bronchitis. At home I get them from an local provider, organically grown whenever possible.
 

Timaca

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Thanks for posting your success, Monty79! It is always exciting to learn how others improve their health. I think I will try adding in some spices too, but probably not as you have (I'm too chicken to do that). :nervous: I do know that when I tried to add some tumeric every day (and not very much) that I ended up with nose bleeds! :eek: When I stopped taking tumeric daily, they went away (pretty immediately).

I eat mostly whole food, plant based (I include small amounts of olive oil and a very small amount of dark chocolate in my diet....also fresh fish on a rare occasion). Just this year I could add in seeds and berries which is nice. But, like you, I can't eat wheat or corn. I also can't eat oats. I will test nuts soon. I actually tried one pecan half last night but didn't feel as well so I am going to wait a couple of days and try again.

How much of the spices do you take daily? Was it 1 teaspoon or 1 tablespoon? And where did you come up with that amount?

I think, I will approach it by finding 7 different herb and spices and rotate those....eating one each week...and starting off with a small amount...something like 1/16 of a teaspoon a day....maybe upping it as the weeks go by....we'll see.

But because of my experience with the tumeric, I don't want to be eating the same spice daily.....

I also will check into hibiscus tea!

Thanks again for sharing!

Best,
 

Timaca

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Hi pamojja~ If I were deficient in Vitamin K, I would think the bleeding would not have stopped when I stopped the daily tumeric.... thanks for your input though! It's always nice when people take the time to suggest things to consider!
 

pamojja

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Hi pamojja~ If I were deficient in Vitamin K, I would think the bleeding would not have stopped when I stopped the daily tumeric...
It just so odd when a commonly used spice like turmeric used by billion Indians everyday causes such bleeding.

Myself I checked at NaturalStandard which supplements could cause problem with bleeding some years ago, and marked all those I took at therapeutic doses in red:

Agents That May Increase Risk of Bleeding or Clotting

Agents reported to cause clinically significant bleeding in case report(s)
Garlic (Allium sativum), ginger, Ginkgo biloba, saw palmetto (Serenoa repens).

Agents that may increase risk of bleeding (based on evidence from basic science, animal study, human case reports/trials, expert opinion, or anecdote)
Acacia, acerola, aconite, agrimony, alfalfa (Medicago sativa)*, aloe, alpha-linolenic acid, alpinia, American ginseng (Panax quinquifolius), American pawpaw, Andrographis paniculata Nees, angelica (Angelica archangelica)*, angel's trumpet, anise (Pimpinella anisum)*, aniseed, annatto, aortic acid, arabinogalactan, arginine (L-arginine), aristolochia, arnica (Arnica montana), asafetida (Ferula asafetida)*, ashwagandha (Withania somnifera L.), aspen bark**, astragalus, avocado (Persea americana), babassu, banaba, barley, Bear's garlic, Bellis perennis, beta-sitosterol, bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), birch (Betula barosma)**, black cohosh (Cimifuga racemosa)**, black currant, bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosis), blessed thistle, bogbean (Menyanthes trifoliata), boldo (Peumus boldus), borage seed oil, breviscapine, bromelain (Anas comosus), bupleurum, burdock (Arctium lappa), calamus, calendula, capsicum, cat's claw (Uncaria tomentosa), celery (Apium graveolens)*, chamomile (Matricaria recutita)*, chaparral (Larrea tridentate (DC) Coville, Larrea divaricata Cav.), chia, chlorella, chondroitin sulfate, cinnamon*, clove (Eugenia aromatica), codonopsis, coenzyme Q10, coleus (Coleus forskohlii), coltsfoot, cordyceps (Cordyceps sinensis), cowhage, cranberry, daisy, dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)*, danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza), Datura wrightii, desert parsley, devil's claw (Harpagophytum procumbens), DHEA, diallyl trisulfide, dong quai (Angelica sinensis), echistatin, elder, EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), evening primrose oil (Oenothera biennis)***, fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.), fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum)*, feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium)***, fig (Ficus carica), fisetin, fish oil***, flavonoids, flaxseed/flax powder (not a concern with flaxseed oil), forskolin, fucus, gamma-linolenic acid, gamma-oryzanol, Ganoderma japonicum, garlic (Allium sativum)***, genistein, German chamomile, ginger (Zingiber officinalis)***, ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba)***, ginseng (Panax spp.)***, globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.), goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.), grape seed (Vitis vinifera), grapefruit juice, green tea (Camellia sinensis), ground ivy, guarana, guggul (Commiphora mukul), gymnema, gymnestra, hawthorn, heartsease**, hirudin, holy basil, horny goat weed, horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum)*, horseradish (Radicula armoracia), jackfruit, jequirity, jiaogulan, juniper, Kan Jang, kava, kelp, kinetin, kiwi, kudzu, lady's mantle, Lathyrus, lavender, lemongrass, leopard's bane (Arnica montana), licorice (liquorice) (Glycyrrhiza glabra)***, ling zhi, lotus, lovage root, male fern (Dryopteris filix-mas), marjoram, meadowsweet (Spirea/Filipendula ulmaria)**, melatonin, methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), mistletoe, modified citrus pectin, mugwort, mullein, nettle, niacin, nopal, nordihydroguairetic acid (NDGA), northern prickly ash, octacosanol, omega-3 fatty acids, onion, oregano, pagoda tree, pantethine, papain, papaw, papaya, parsley (Petroselinum crispum), passion flower (Passiflora incarnata), PC-SPES, peony, policosanol, polypodium, poplar**, populus, prickly ash (Zanthoxylum spp.)*, propolis, PSK, Pycnogenol® (Pinus pinaster ssp. atlantica), quassia (Picrasma excelsa)*, quercetin, quinine, red clover (Trifolium pratense)*, red yeast rice, rehmannia, reishi (Ganoderma lucidum), resveratrol, rhubarb, Roman chamomile, rose hip, rosemary, rue, rutin, safflower, sage, sarsaparilla**, sassafras, savory, saw palmetto (Serenoa repens), schisandra, scotch broom, sea buckthorn, seaweed, selenium, SHA-10, shea, shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes), Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus), sorrel, southern prickly ash, soy***, Spanish bayonet (Yucca spp.), spirulina, St. John's wort, star anise, stinging nettle, strawberry, sweet birch**, sweet clover (Melilotus spp.)*, sweet marjoram, sweet woodruff, tamanu, tamarind, tarragon, taurine, tea, thyme, tonka bean, turmeric (Curcuma longa), usnea, vanilla, verbena, vitamin A, vitamin C***, vitamin E***, wasabi, watercress (Nasturtium officinale), wheatgrass, wild carrot, wild lettuce, willow, willow bark (Salix spp.)**, wintergreen**, yarrow, yew, yohimbe.

Possible pro-coagulant herbs and supplements (based on evidence from basic science, animal study, human case reports/trials, expert opinion, or anecdote)

Abuta, acerola, aconite, African wild potato, agrimony, alfalfa, annatto, apricot, arnica, astragalus, bael, bilberry, black haw, blessed thistle, cat's claw, chlorella, coenzyme Q10, cordyceps, DHEA (dehydroepiandrosterone), dong quai, ginseng, goldenrod, goldenseal, guggul, horsetail, jequirity, jiaogulan, lime, melatonin (multiple cases of prothrombin time (PT) reductions in patients on warfarin, some with minor bleeding possibly due to warfarin), milk thistle, mistletoe, myrcia, nopal, Panax ginseng (may decrease anticoagulant effect of warfarin), psyllium, raspberry, rhubarb, sage, scotch broom, shepherd's purse, skunk cabbage, stinging nettle, tamanu, tea, white oak, white water lily, yarrow.

Vitamin K-rich foods or herbs that may decrease anticoagulant effects of warfarin (Coumadin®) (based on evidence from basic science, animal study, human case reports/trials, expert opinion, or anecdote)

Beet greens, Bolthouse® Bom Dia Acai Berry With Blueberry Juice, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, collard greens, dandelion greens, endive, green pepper, kale, mustard greens, okra, red leaf lettuce, sauerkraut, spinach, spring onions, Swiss chard, turnip greens, white cabbage.

NOTE: Because passionflower, hydroalcoholic extracts, juniper, and Verbena officinalis supply variable quantities of vitamin K, they may lessen the effect of oral anticoagulant therapy.

NOTE: This is not an all-inclusive list.
* Agents with coumarin constituents.
** Agents with salicylate constituents.
*** Agents that inhibit platelets.

Copyright © 2012 Natural Standard. All Rights Reserved.
With all those taken together never experienced any bleeding. But also am very sufficient in vitamins K1+K2.

Except after the addition of only one agent: blood in stool, blood in mucous of the nose, and much more liquid blood (taking glucose readings) - and that's 1 innocent 81mg baby aspirin.
 

Timaca

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pamojja~ I wouldn't have even thought to consider tumeric as a possible cause for my nose bleeds, except someone on a FaceBook group for Dr. Greger (who recommends taking tumeric) asked if anyone in the group had increased bruising or bleeding. My nosebleeds had recently started so I did internet searches on the subject and found that tumeric can do that. So I quit eating tumeric daily. No issues since. I still love tumeric (and ginger) together...and I cook with it often. I just don't put 1/16 to 1/8th tsp on my hot cereal every morning. :)
 

Wishful

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I'm not sure that I'm overly sensitive to antioxidants, but peroxynitrite scavengers make my ME symptoms much worse. Turmeric, cinnamon, resveratol: all cause severe worsening of my symptoms. I haven't done extensive experiments to prove that it's the peroxynitrite scavenging that causes the problem, but that's what the evidence points to so far.
 
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I'm just curious, @Monty79, how did you take that much of so many spices? A whole tablespoon each day? Did you just add them to your food, or just mix them in water and drink them?
No, I don't mix them in water, that must make an interesting tasting concoction indeed.:depressed: I'm just taking one tablespoon of each spice a day directly in my mouth and swallowing it down as fast as I can with a big gulp of water on empty stomach.

I'm doing this now for about 8 months and I'm still feeling very good, all of my symptoms are gone, no side-effects at all so far for me. Even my long-term constipation that I suffered from for 20+ years is just gone. And I will continue on this path for sure, after reading a lot of studies that indicate how beneficial spices and herbs are to the gut health, like this one:

https://www.nature.com/articles/srep09253
 
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Wishful

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I'm just taking one tablespoon of each spice a day directly in my mouth and swallowing it down as fast as I can with a big gulp of water on empty stomach.
I take cumin powder, 1 lvl tsp every 3 days, to block physically-induced PEM. I hold it under my tongue for a few minutes, just in case the cuminaldehyde is transferred to the brain more effectively that way. I haven't done the testing to figure out if it really is worth doing it that way. With LDN, holding it under my tongue was about 30% more effective than swallowing it.

The other spices on your list all make my symptoms much worse, so I avoid them.

Hmmm, I suppose I could try holding cinnamon under my tongue (for sublingual absorption) and then spitting it out, to see if the effect involves the gut microbiome or not. Those convinced that the effect is due to gut bacteria can try that test (with whichever spices/herbs) too.
 

ljimbo423

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Yes, I'm convinced that my improvement in health is due to gut bacteria, very much so. But everyone has to try for themselves of course.
I agree 100%! It was the change in your gut microbiota or bacteria, from the antibacterial effects of the herbs that led to you recovering your health.

I am getting good improvements from much lower doses of herbs. I am slowly increasing the amount I am taking though, to speed up the process.

I really appreciate you sharing your experience.:thumbsup:
 

brenda

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@Monty79

I found that when l took herbs which stimulated the immune system, my thyroid seemed to get worse which l pressumed to be due to the thyroid antibodies increasing. So this did not happen to you?
 

Wishful

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I don't know whether my thyroid was involved, but some immunostimulants do make my symptoms worse. Elderberries are my prime example. It's so hard to know why something has an effect. It may not be the obvious logical reason.
 
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@Monty79

I found that when l took herbs which stimulated the immune system, my thyroid seemed to get worse which l pressumed to be due to the thyroid antibodies increasing. So this did not happen to you?
No, this did not happen to me. But I'm really just taking cloves, cinnamon,oregano, triphala, cummin seeds... the ones I described in my opening post. I think their positive effects for me was due to their antimicrobial properties in the gut, those herbs have no stimulating effects to the thyroid or the immune system at all.

What kind of herbs did you take you think stimulated your thyroid or immune system? I only know about Ashwagandha, and yes, this herb is stimulating the thyroid for me too. o_O I couldn't sleep for days after taking 500mg, I still have a whole bottle of these, maybe I will try again in the future, but I don't think so. :depressed:
 

brenda

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No, this did not happen to me. But I'm really just taking cloves, cinnamon,oregano, triphala, cummin seeds... the ones I described in my opening post. I think their positive effects for me was due to their antimicrobial properties in the gut, those herbs have no stimulating effects to the thyroid or the immune system at all.

What kind of herbs did you take you think stimulated your thyroid or immune system? I only know about Ashwagandha, and yes, this herb is stimulating the thyroid for me too. o_O I couldn't sleep for days after taking 500mg, I still have a whole bottle of these, maybe I will try again in the future, but I don't think so. :depressed:
Black seed oil, frankensence, and Amla come to mind.
 
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Black seed oil, frankensence, and Amla come to mind.
I¨ve never researched about black seed oil or frakensence, but Amla makes 1/3 of the triphala formulation and I never read about Amla being immune stimulating?

I'm tolerating Amla/the triphala formulation very well so far, I'm taking it for 5 months now. It has helped me to get rid of candida and my constipation issues I had for many (20+) years. The triphala formulation (and all other herbs and spices I'm taking) is also one of the highest you can find on the ORAC list of antioxidant foods:

https://www.superfoodly.com/orac-values/

All of those herbs high in antioxidants also seem to be very effective to get rid of pathogenic bacteria in the gut, meaning they are all very antimicrobial. I would be really curious to know if there is a connection about antioxidants and the microbiome, so far I couldn't really find any research about this.

All I know is, I'm still feeling really well on my daily intake of 1 teaspoon full of those herbs mentioned. :) My symptoms didn't come back so far and I'm still feeling well. :)
 
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Sumac bran is the number 1 ORAC food. I bought sumac bran extract, I think it was 50:1 strength from a website. Have forgotten to take it regularly.