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'Finding new voices for recovery: A narrative from co-learners in an innovative group programme'

Dolphin

Senior Member
Messages
17,567
(Not a recommendation)

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S187638201500205X

European Journal of Integrative Medicine
Volume 7, Supplement 1, 25 September 2015, Pages 18–19



Finding new voices for recovery: A narrative from co-learners in an innovative group programme
Oxfordshire CFS/ME Service, Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, 11 Talbot Road, Oxford OX2 8LL, United kingdom

doi:10.1016/j.eujim.2015.09.048




Introduction: Finding a recovery pathway from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) can be extremely challenging for individuals who in addition to debilitating symptoms often feel isolated, with diminishing identity. This phenomenological study aimed to explore participants’ experiences within a recovery-focused group programme called ‘Rebuilding your Life’, co-developed by people with and recovered from CFS/ME and healthcare professionals. Facilitated by an expert trainer in Neuro-Linguistic Programming, the programme uses the examples of people already recovered from CFS/ME as models for successful recovery. It has an ethos of co-enquiry between participants (patients and facilitators) as joint and equal collaborators.

Methods: A phenomenological exploration of the experiences of 13 group participants; 9 people with CFS/ME, 1 recovered person and 3 facilitators (including researcher/facilitator). Data collection involved: (1) researcher/facilitator keeping a reflective journal (2) participants’ reviews (individual and group) of their experiences in the programme, with an invitation to co-produce resource(s) for others, recording aspects of their own narratives. Data analysis: A heuristic process intertwining participants’ narratives and researcher's reflections, developing themes through text, metaphor and imagery.

Results: Identification of key themes: (1) gaining hope (2) internalising an image of a personal future recovery (3) finding a voice. A poster was co-produced by the group illustrating these themes, both in its making process and its content.

Conclusions: This group programme may offer a means to developing a recovery-focused community, through its perpetuating format of those who recover becoming models and voicing narratives to on-going cohorts. This concept has potential in many areas of health provision.
 
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Dolphin

Senior Member
Messages
17,567
Related:

https://showtime.gre.ac.uk/index.php/hsc/bt/paper/viewPaper/937

Voicing body and embodying voice - a performance
Hilly Raphael, Jenni Mair, Sarah Frossel

Building: Queen Anne
Room: Duncan Classroom QA110
Date: 08-07-2016 11:30 – 12:00

Abstract
Rebuilding your Life (RyL) is a recovery-focused programme developed by those recovered and recovering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) and healthcare professionals(McDermott, 2015). Its ethos of co-enquiry enables all participants (recoverers and facilitators) to be equal collaborators (Raphael, 2015). The main facilitator, Sarah Frossell, uses Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) and coaches each person within the group by truly attending to the voice of their body in terms of the illness and of their return to wellbeing.

Jenni Mair (recovered after eighteen years of CFS/ME) and Hilly Raphael (a RyL cofacilitator) celebrate the restorying they experienced through RyL. They’ve identified concepts of each finding a voice, further enabled through their collaboration(Raphael, Mair and Frossell, 2015). They explore the voice that Jenni discovered which empowered her to acknowledge aspects of life previously un-voiced, and to create an image of a positive future which she’s already entering. They acknowledge the role of voice as a conduit of emotional and bodily stories, which transition from the internal to the external body, and from one to another; ultimately when attended to enabling healing and transformation.

This reflection, acting as a meta-performance, explores the initiation of recovery through voice and body performing.

Keywords: voice, body, healing, recovery

References:

McDermott, C. (2014) Patient and Public Involvement: Case studies in primary care research, National Institute for Health Research, p22-24. Available at http://www.spcr.nihr.ac.uk/PPI/rp/case-studies-final-november-website.pdf (Accessed 05/06/16)

Raphael, H. et al. (2015) Co-creating recovery in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) - Rebuilding your Life group programme Available at: http://www.oxfordhealth.nhs.uk/resources/2014/01/RYL-poster-Feb-15.pdf (Accessed 05/06/16)

Raphael, H; Mair, J; Frossell, S. (2015) ‘Finding new voices for recovery: A narrative from co-learners in an innovative group programme’, European Journal of Integrative Medicine, 7, supplement 1, 18-19, Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S187638201500205X (Accessed 05/06/16)
 

wastwater

Senior Member
Messages
1,267
Location
uk
What next a pillow that electrocutes you if you don't wake up,naughty ME patients,then onto some relearning.
 
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worldbackwards

Senior Member
Messages
2,051
I'm afraid. I can't tell if this is a joke by you or a serious piece to "help" ME sufferers...
It's a joke by me. It comes from the spoof current affair programme Brass Eye, and was intended as a motivational programme for prisoners (Geoff Boycott didn't know he was being spoofed). Morris had a good eye for the foibles of the medical profession as well - I remember a sketch where doctors filmed the disabled because they thought that they were 'just lazy'. Ahead of his time, alas...
 

Hutan

Senior Member
Messages
1,099
Location
New Zealand
Results: Identification of key themes: (1) gaining hope (2) internalising an image of a personal future recovery (3) finding a voice. A poster was co-produced by the group illustrating these themes, both in its making process and its content.

Dear Hilly, Jenny and Sarah of the Oxfordshire CFS/ME Service

I never lost my voice, thanks, same with other people with ME I know. How about actually listening to us for a change instead of imposing your wiffly-waffly loopy thought processes?

I already have hope for future recovery, thanks. No need for a poster. Studies like yours actually diminish my stocks of hope.

How about you stop wasting your time and that of people with ME and instead help advocate for the necessary biomedical research to bring our hope for recovery to reality?

Yours sincerely, Hutan
 

Snow Leopard

Hibernating
Messages
5,902
Location
South Australia
I became ill when I was young, so I had no real conception of what a lifelong chronic illness is like. I had hope of recovery for a long time, but regardless of what I did or tried, it never happened. Before brainwashing people into expecting something that probably won't happen, perhaps we need to develop treatments that lead to recovery first.