Fibromyalgia: transfer of patient IgG antibodies produce FM symptoms in mice

WantedAlive

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Passive transfer of fibromyalgia symptoms from patients to mice


Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is characterized by widespread pain and tenderness, and patients typically experience fatigue and emotional distress. The etiology and pathophysiology of fibromyalgia are not fully explained and there are no effective drug treatments. Here we show that IgG from FMS patients produced sensory hypersensitivity by sensitizing nociceptive neurons. Mice treated with IgG from FMS patients displayed increased sensitivity to noxious mechanical and cold stimulation, and nociceptive fibers in skin-nerve preparations from mice treated with FMS IgG displayed an increased responsiveness to cold and mechanical stimulation. These mice also displayed reduced locomotor activity, reduced paw grip strength, and a loss of intraepidermal innervation. In contrast, transfer of IgG-depleted serum from FMS patients or IgG from healthy control subjects had no effect. Patient IgG did not activate naive sensory neurons directly. IgG from FMS patients labeled satellite glial cells and neurons in vivo and in vitro, as well as myelinated fiber tracts and a small number of macrophages and endothelial cells in mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG), but no cells in the spinal cord. Furthermore, FMS IgG bound to human DRG. Our results demonstrate that IgG from FMS patients produces painful sensory hypersensitivities by sensitizing peripheral nociceptive afferents and suggest that therapies reducing patient IgG titers may be effective for fibromyalgia.
I'm always dubious about symptom evaluation in mice. I guess it adds weight to the autoimmune theory for both FM and likely ME/CFS. But I believe some ME/CFS patients have had plasmapharesis without success, is that true?
 
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Passive transfer of fibromyalgia symptoms from patients to mice




I'm always dubious about symptom evaluation in mice. I guess it adds weight to the autoimmune theory for both FM and likely ME/CFS. But I believe some ME/CFS patients have had plasmapharesis without success, is that true?
If you are referring to the Carmen Scheibenbogen study yes, there were mixed results. But I heard of one patient who always went into full remission for three weeks after each session
 
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Thanks, I'll go back and look at that. Even in the patient it worked, 3 weeks seems an extremely brief remission after plasmapharesis. I don't even think the mRNA vaccine could pump out antibodies that quickly! There must be something else to it surely.
The study was paid by Fresenius and unfortunately very expensive so it was only a very small group and there was no follow-up study bc Fresenius declined to donate. That being said, the erased AAB can be found in only a subgroup of patients (30% - I'm negative). Interestingly a new study on Long Covid showed overlapping AAB.
 

nerd

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But I believe some ME/CFS patients have had plasmapharesis without success, is that true?
The disease is not "only" in the plasma. It is also in the cells. The plasma can only serve as a dissolving buffer. What might really have potential is HDACi for viral reactivation, miRNA release, cell cycle regulation, and subsequent/parallel antiviral therapy and plasmapheresis. This would have to repeated a couple of times for sufficient clearance potential.
 
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The disease is not "only" in the plasma. It is also in the cells. The plasma can only serve as a dissolving buffer. What might really have potential is HDACi for viral reactivation, miRNA release, cell cycle regulation, and subsequent/parallel antiviral therapy and plasmapheresis. This would have to repeated a couple of times for sufficient clearance potential.
The problem is that such a trial would be very costly I think 💭
 

nerd

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The problem is that such a trial would be very costly I think 💭
Most definitely, plasmapheresis is very expensive. It will be much cheaper to just remove the blood and take electrolytes (preferably via infusion) and anemia medications while monitoring the blood cell count. Unfortunately, some ME patients also suffer from mild anemia already, so this isn't applicable to them. This kind of therapy is also stigmatized because it has been used in medieval times by the Catholic Church, kind of.
 
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Most definitely, plasmapheresis is very expensive. It will be much cheaper to just remove the blood and take electrolytes (preferably via infusion) and anemia medications while monitoring the blood cell count. Unfortunately, some ME patients also suffer from mild anemia already, so this isn't applicable to them. This kind of therapy is also stigmatized because it has been used in medieval times by the Catholic Church, kind of.
Yeah it has some flavor of it at least
 
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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/07/210701120703.htm

New research has shown that many of the symptoms in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) are caused by antibodies that increase the activity of pain-sensing nerves throughout the body. The results show that fibromyalgia is a disease of the immune system, rather than the currently held view that it originates in the brain.
 

Alvin2

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A very interesting study.
I hope there are scientists following up on this, pursuing replication and working on new treatments.
 

Pyrrhus

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"The results show that fibromyalgia is a disease of the immune system, rather than the currently held view that it originates in the brain."
Whatever reporter wrote that didn't even read this study.

This study clearly demonstrates that is a neuroimmune condition, involving both the immune system and the nervous system.
 
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Pyrrhus

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Related publications:

Identification of a MicroRNA Signature for the Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia (Cerda et al., 2015)
https://forums.phoenixrising.me/thr...ture-for-the-diagnosis-of-fibromyalgia.36480/

Fibromyalgia Is Correlated with Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thinning (Garcia-Martin et al. 2016)
https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0161574

Brain glial activation in fibromyalgia – A multi-site positron emission tomography investigation (Albrecht et al. 2019)
https://forums.phoenixrising.me/thr...-of-fibromyalgia-patients.61667/#post-2321470
 

Pyrrhus

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Below is a diagram that might help to understand this paper:

The paper describes how antibodies from patients with fibromyalgia attach to the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), which are the pain-sensing nerve roots that run along the spinal cord.

This finding leads to the important question:

What inflammation may be happening in these spinal nerve roots in order to trigger production of these antibodies in fibromyalgia patients?


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