Fatty Acids for intestinal repair?

Cort

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Are polyunsaturated fatty acids helpful for intestinal repair? This paper suggests they are very good for the intestines. Are they part of Dr. De MEirleir's plan?

: Dig Dis Sci. 2007 Jun;52(6):1485-96. Epub 2007 Mar 28. Links
Contribution of polyunsaturated fatty acids to intestinal repair in protein-energy malnutrition.



The aim of this study was to assess the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids supplied in the diet on intestinal mucosa repair in a rat model of protein-energy malnutrition. Rats were fed either a standard semipurified diet or the same diet containing lactose as the only source of carbohydrate to cause protein-energy malnutrition. Diarrhea was induced within 24 h and was maintained for 2 weeks, after which both groups of rats were fed for 1 week either the standard diet or the standard diet supplemented with different sources of fatty acids, such as olive oil (OO), fish oil (FO), and purified phospholipids from pig brain (BPL).

The lactose-enriched diet caused loss of enterocyte microvilli, lymphocyte infiltration, supranuclear cytoplasmic vesiculation, decreased number of goblet cells, low-density enlarged mitochondria, and less cristae.
Note the focus on Omega 3's rather than Omega 6's. Increased antioxidant activity was prominent.

B] The FO diet improved the pathology score[/B] with an increased number of goblet cells, ratio of microvilli length to crypt depth, and percentage of intraepithelial lymphocytes compared to those found in rats with protein-energy malnutrition. We previously reported that chronic diarrhea depletes the antioxidant defense in rat intestine; we now show that both, the FO and the BPL diets, increase GSH levels in colon and that some antioxidant enzyme activities vary according to the source of fatty acids, with higher catalase and superoxide dismutase by the FO diet in jejunum, increased catalase by the BPL diet in jejunum, and elevated glutathione peroxidase by the OO diet in colon. The fatty acid profile of intestinal mucosa reflects the source of fat in the diet, with the lowest ratio of n-6/n-3 for rats fed the FO diet. These results suggest that dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly those in the n-3 series, may play an important role in intestinal repair in chronic diarrhea due to protein-energy malnutrition
 

Jody

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Okay, that is what I was thinking too.

Apparently most of us get too many omega 6's and not enough omega 3's which upsets the balance our bodies need for health.

As to the gut repair, the more I read about fatty acids, the more I am amazed at their versatility. Seems like they are an important part of just about everything.

I guess it would make sense then that if we have a deficiency in omega 3's, and an excess of omega 6's, that alot of our physiology gets thrown out of whack.
 

R**

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Body Bio (Patricia Kane) says 4:1 ratio omega 6 to omega 3. Brian Peskin similar. Cell wall ratios I think can differ in different parts of body. Kane picked the 4:1 ratio for the Body Bio Oils.

Supposedly those of us with CBS and or NOS upregulation.. I get confused.. cannot process the lipids which leaves them around for bacteria to play with (yasko).. That one bothers me as I was sold on the idea of the more fats/lipids the better in ratio. I do wodner if the body can pick and choose what it needs and discard the rest or if the ratio of 6/3 is that important as Kane and Peskin seem to claim.

The GAPS diet is big on fats like ghee (has butyrate in it naturally), coconut oil, fats from meat to heal the gut.

Its raw Omega 6 we need. We get to much refined omega 6.
 

Jody

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I know that the pain I used to get way deep in the pit of my stomach doesn't happen when I get alot of good fats and oils and it is liable to come back if I don't.