Famotidine Against SARS-CoV2: A Hope or Hype? Mayo Clin Proc. n August 2020;95(8):1797-1809

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https://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196(20)30543-7/pdf

Famotidine Against SARS-CoV2: A Hope or Hype?

I found this recently while researching Famotidine's h2 potency and h2's effects on the immune system and its effects on ebv on the back of that. Seemingly what this issue from mayo clinic has in it is really interesting!

I know other people have taken this stuff before from PR and it's not worked for them, but sounds like it's worth a try. You can get this stuff OTC if you're in the right country.

It is not the maiden time that the scientists have decided to “repurpose” the drug famotidine, an age-old antacid, to combat a viral disease. The effects of histamine on different substrates of immune system and immunomodulatory effects of H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) are well recognized.4 Through binding with histamine receptor 2 and modulating the effector pathways mediated by protein kinase A, famotidine potentially regulates innate and adaptive immune responses (Figures 1 and 2). It modulates antibody generation by B cells, cytokine release by T helper cell 1 (Th1), T-cell differentiation and proliferation, mast cell degranulation, and dendritic cell response
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It has been documented that famotidine completely demolishes histamine receptor 2emediated negative effects on cytokine production, especially tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) and interferong7 ; lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-a production; and B7-1 expression on monocytes,8 and also curtails the inhibitory effects of histamine on the production of Th1-mediated cytokine release
H2RA has been used with some success against HIV,10,11 human papilloma virus,12 herpes simplex virus,13 Epstein-Barr virus,14 and chronic hepatitis B infection.
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Authors

Ritwik Ghosh, MBBS, MD Department of General Medicine Burdwan Medical College and Hospital Burdwan, West Bengal, India

Subhankar Chatterjee, MBBS, MD Department of General Medicine Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences Ranchi, Jharkhand, India

Souvik Dubey, MD, DM Department of Neuromedicine Bangur Institute of Neurosciences Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research and SSKM Hospital Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Carl J. Lavie, MD Department of Cardiovascular Diseases John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute Ochsner Clinical School The University of Queensland School of Medicine New Orleans, LA

I think it's ebv potential in modulating t cell activity and preventing ebv replication from further producing il10 is interesting.

interleukin-10 (IL-10), a product of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) replication gene BCRF1, shares extensive structural and functional similarity with the human cytokine IL-10. Both viral and human IL-10 inhibit T cell growth and interferon-g production.
Research Paper for the above quote
 
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It's more the fact that most me/cfs have a hhv-6 or ebv infection replicating regularly and according to one study Cort posted a few years ago. 50% of patients report OI or POTS symptoms. Now calcium channel blockers are not prescribed for those two disorders. Things like mestinon are.

But the SPECT scan research did show lack of blood flow to the brain and low blood volume is also common. Calcium channel blockers do help with that. Nimotop is a calcium channel blocker that specifically works in the brain so that's where it's made action concentrates.

So definitely doesn't apply to everyone. I've just pooled together ideas based on what I've been reading.