Eggs: Scrambled vs. Hardboiled Symptoms

GreenMachineX

Senior Member
Messages
354
Likes
207
Just in the past week, I've realized that how I prepare my eggs determines what symptoms I'll get from them. Hardboiled will rev me up, give me terrible health anxiety (of the "am I dying?" variety), make it harder to sleep, extreme mood swings (like excess dopamine), and im sure some other stuff I haven't identified yet. Scrambled, I'm more calm, normal (for me) amounts of anxiety, but my mood is more stable and I'm able to laugh more. The one downside to scrambled is gut motility is a problem.

I've had a food sensitivity test, and I was only a 1 on a range from 0-4. The doctor said that's no big deal.

Has anyone experienced something this bizarre?
 

BrightCandle

Senior Member
Messages
836
Likes
2,903
Eggs being a lot of protein the more you cook them the more the proteins denature and the bigger the impact on nutrients you ultimately get from them in protein. Potentially if you hard boil the eggs longer or shorter times may change how you react to them. When it comes to scrambled eggs potentially its not the egg but the oil that is causing you issues, various oils can cause quite a bit of gut inflammation. On a physical level oil will repel the water stopping the stool properly forming, but the scrambling process may be breaking up the item better than your chewing and stomach acid.

Try playing with cooking times and changing oil type, something like avocado oil or another non seed oil.
 

GreenMachineX

Senior Member
Messages
354
Likes
207
Eggs being a lot of protein the more you cook them the more the proteins denature and the bigger the impact on nutrients you ultimately get from them in protein. Potentially if you hard boil the eggs longer or shorter times may change how you react to them. When it comes to scrambled eggs potentially its not the egg but the oil that is causing you issues, various oils can cause quite a bit of gut inflammation. On a physical level oil will repel the water stopping the stool properly forming, but the scrambling process may be breaking up the item better than your chewing and stomach acid.

Try playing with cooking times and changing oil type, something like avocado oil or another non seed oil.
Interesting. I only cook the eggs for about 10 minutes, then put them in an ice bath, so a little shorter than what's recommended. That could be why they hit me so much harder. Maybe I'll hardboil a little longer to see if it makes a difference.

I only use butter for scrambled which I wouldn't think would cause any issues.
 

hapl808

Senior Member
Messages
1,115
Likes
2,794
How you cook things can definitely change symptoms. I don't think we always know why, but I agree to just go by your symptoms if they are consistent.

Try having hard boiled eggs with the same amount of butter to determine if butter is the issue, or the preparation style.
 

Wishful

Senior Member
Messages
4,740
Likes
8,623
Location
Alberta
You could test the protein vs oil question by heating some oil to the same temperature that you do for scrambled eggs and swallowing that (after cooling, of course). Then butter vs oil (no other foods to complicate the test) if necessary. Butter definitely contains chemicals that could affect your body (as does most foods). Even 'vegetable oil' isn't all the same; safflower improves my sleep, while canola doesn't, due to the different ratios of the various fatty acids.

Having different symptoms from scrambled vs boiled eggs might be considered bizarre, but with ME, bizarre is unfortunately common. :meh:
 
Messages
727
Likes
1,309
Location
Israel
I feel good on hardboiled eggs.
Scambled eggs in virgin olive oil or goat butter (The only fats I tolerate), gives me stomach problems.

Fried and cooked oil has free radicals as opposed to boiling in water.

There is a big difference in the energy needed in digestion between frying or boiling. A healthy person feels no difference but we are over sensitive.