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Effects of methamphetamine or amphetamine

TiredBill

Senior Member
Messages
335
Last summer after almost 33 years with CFS, I felt a rebound in the amount of fatigue I was experiencing. I had a new medical group and a new Internist. The Internist (having little else to offer) suggested I see a Psychiatrist in Mental Health. I decided not to argue. I happened to get a referral to a great doctor (IMO) who, after running his diagnostic checks determined my fatigue was not caused my depression issues (which I knew) and that I was in surprisingly good mental health considering I felt knackered.

One thing he offered to let me try was Adderol or Ritalin to see if they might help. At his suggestion, I decided to try the Adderall, but asked for the lowest possible dose. He thought that was 10 mg time-released, but discovered (to his surprise) that there was a 5 mg option.

Before I took it I had many second thoughts. But I had "one of those days" just after I filled the prescription and I took the pill. Did it help? Sort of. But I felt drugged. Like I was using speed on top of being very fatigued. I didn't like the feeling, nor did I like the long term risks.

I tried it a couple more times afterward with the same results. I felt 5 mg strongly (I tend to be sensitive to meds) and to me, it felt like a very unnatural band-aid covering up a problem. It "worked" to a point, but it wasn't for me.

Bill
 

Alvin2

The good news is patients don't die the bad news..
Messages
2,955
Dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine) is more energy oriented, its used for narcolepsy but its a rather dangerous drug with nasty long term side effects (not to mention its controlled status)
 

me/cfs 27931

Guest
Messages
1,294
I've taken prescription Ritalin, Adderall and Vyvanse in the past. I feel they played a significant role in worsening my ME/CFS.

Stimulants provided some short term concentration and functional improvement plus fatigue reduction, but at the expense of my long term health. Had I been informed of the risks, I would not have taken the stimulants.

I found Vyvanse the best tolerated, and keep 10mg on hand for when I absolutely must function. This is on average once every 3 months.

Stimulants invariably worsen the push/crash cycle, and leave me bedridden for at least the day after taking them (normally I'm just housebound).
 

drob31

Senior Member
Messages
1,487
Last summer after almost 33 years with CFS, I felt a rebound in the amount of fatigue I was experiencing. I had a new medical group and a new Internist. The Internist (having little else to offer) suggested I see a Psychiatrist in Mental Health. I decided not to argue. I happened to get a referral to a great doctor (IMO) who, after running his diagnostic checks determined my fatigue was not caused my depression issues (which I knew) and that I was in surprisingly good mental health considering I felt knackered.

One thing he offered to let me try was Adderol or Ritalin to see if they might help. At his suggestion, I decided to try the Adderall, but asked for the lowest possible dose. He thought that was 10 mg time-released, but discovered (to his surprise) that there was a 5 mg option.

Before I took it I had many second thoughts. But I had "one of those days" just after I filled the prescription and I took the pill. Did it help? Sort of. But I felt drugged. Like I was using speed on top of being very fatigued. I didn't like the feeling, nor did I like the long term risks.

I tried it a couple more times afterward with the same results. I felt 5 mg strongly (I tend to be sensitive to meds) and to me, it felt like a very unnatural band-aid covering up a problem. It "worked" to a point, but it wasn't for me.

Bill


Sounds like it fixed something, but there were still other things out of balance like hormone levels.
 

TiredBill

Senior Member
Messages
335
Sounds like it fixed something, but there were still other things out of balance like hormone levels.

@drob31

Yes. Spot on.

After my Internist told me all my labs were "normal," I started shifting through them. And discovering that "normal" ranges and optimal ranges are far from the same thing.

My first find was that my Testosterone levels were barely inside "normal," and that low T could mimic many of the same problems we see in CFS. It took a battle royale, and a kind Encoronologist bucking his boss, but I got TRT (testosterone replacement therapy)and it helped immensely.

One TRT kicked in, I started looking around to see what else might be "normal" but not optimal, and I was in the bottom of the rage in thyroid (T4) wish and top of range (bad) for TSH. So I pushed the same Endo to treat thyroid with levothyroxine (with the correct dosing still being incrementally dialed in).

The thyroid meds have helped too. And Vitamin D which was below range (unmentioned by Internist) and low B12.

Too much information perhaps in another person/s thread (and apologies to the OP), but I did want to validate your good call. Well done!

Bill